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LAW 202 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Exam Guide - Canada, Indian Act, Colonialism


Department
Law
Course Code
LAW 202
Professor
Hugo Choquette
Study Guide
Final

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LAW 202

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Module 1- The Colonial Legacy
Terminology:
Aboriginal:
Refers to the first inhabitants of Canada, and includes First Nations, Inuit and Metis
people
Popular usage after 1982 section 35 of the Constitution
First Nations:
Used to describe Aboriginal peoples of Canada who are ethnically neither Metis or Inuit
Coo usage i the s ad s ad geerall replaed the ter Idia
“igular First Natio refers to a ad, a resere-based community or a larger tribunal
grouping
Inuit:
Refers to specific groups of people generally living in the far north who are not
osidered Idias uder Caadia La
Metis:
Refers to a collective of cultures and ethnic identities that resulted from unions between
Aboriginal and European people in what is now Canada
Indian:
Refers to the legal identity of a First Nations person who is registered under the Indian
Act
Term should only be used when referring to a First Nations person with status under the
Indian Act, and only within its legal context
Aside from this speifi legal otet, the ter Idia i Caada is osidered
outdated and may be considered offensive
Indigenous:
Used to encompass a variety of Aboriginal groups
Most frequently used in an international, transnational and global context
Native:
General term that refers to a person or thing that has originated from a particular place
The ter Natie does ot deote a speifi Aorigial ethiit
“oe a feel that Natie has a egatie ootatio ad is outdated
Video 1: Introduction and Terminology
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Individual Identity: ex. Anishinaabe, Cree, Metis, Mohawk, Haida, Salish,
Haudenosaunee
Collective Identity: ex. Aboriginal, Indigenous, Native
Terms to Avoid:
Indian First Nations
Eskimo Inuk (Inuit)
Aboriginal or Indigenous?
Aboriginal Law= Law of the Canadian state related to Aboriginal or Indigenous peoples
Indigenous Law= legal traditions of Indigenous peoples
First Nations:
Diverse, collective term
Unique cultures and sense of identity
Inuit:
Ihait Caada’s orth
Related to Indigenous peoples of Alaska and Greenland
Colletie hoelad is Iuit Nuagat
Metis:
Unique history and culture
European and Aboriginal
Constitute a distinct people
Not simply mixed ancestry
Key Points:
Indigenous peoples share a deep attachment to land and traditional territories
In Canada, Aboriginal peoples include the First Nations, Inuit and Metis
Aboriginal peoples prefer their traditional ways of referring to themselves
Aboriginal peoples include diverse cultures and identities
Aboriginal law refers to the law of Canadian state relating to Aboriginal peoples
Indigenous law refers to the legal orders of Aboriginal peoples themselves
Video 2: From Contact to Colonialism
In this video:
The relationship between Aboriginal peoples and European colonial powers changed
over time
Early relationship was nation-to-nation, built around alliances formalized as treaties
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