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[FSN 503] - Final Exam Guide - Ultimate 33 pages long Study Guide!


Department
Fashion
Course Code
FSN 503
Professor
Catherine Sutton
Study Guide
Final

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Ryerson
FSN 503
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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https://courses.ryerson.ca/d2l/le/content/70773/viewContent/1210015/View
How instagram is curated and how people choose images to represent their personal brand
- Aestheticcccccccc omg pale pink
- Don’t want to post more than 2 or 3 times a day
- You have to show that you have more to do in your day than just post on
instagram; that what your posting has a foundation of reality underneath it
- Not as exciting
- You also don’t want to show off; if someone sees too much of you it becomes
more about forcing someone to look at you rather than having that person
“follow” you
Andy Warhol made copies of his artwork; does it make it oversaturated or display the value of
the original piece?
Eric Kessel filled a room with all the photos that were uploaded onto Flipper in just one day
- The value of the individuality of the piece is lost when it’s piled with everything else it’s
posted alongside
The printing press disseminated information a lot better in the form of books than before, when
everything has hand-written
- Potentially the most important invention of all time
Mimesis: act of resembling what is seen
- Similar to mirror
- The idea was that you could have a representation as an exact mirror; the image
actually became the ideal of the thing itself
- “This is a reflection (or as close to) as the thing that is being copied”
Leng Jun portraits are founded on mimesis; they’re almost exact
- Is there symbolism in this, or is it a simple copy of reality?
Peter Claesz’ Still Life with Turkey (1627)
- How does this painting represent a dutch scene of daily life in the 17c?
- Scene of a meal that’s just been left; everything looks very real
- Still life was a common form in the Dutch 17c (Amsterdam)
- Rise in the middle class economically, so they’d have images like this in their home and
have more luxurious meals; the world was becoming more accessible (some of the food
and utensils like the China and salt reflect that)
- Allegorical perspective on mortality
- The apples are starting to get rotten, other food is getting bad; message is that
even though this looks great time is short to indulge in the meal (life)
Are photographs symbols or a reflection of the real world
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Look at slides for info on positivism
- Kind of the birth of the scientific method; ridding the world of biases and influences in
perceptions of it, how does the world work?
Sparks on the body of a prostitute was an example of this; uncovering the invisible world
- They could see things super close up and document the proof of how things worked
Photos were used to identify criminals by their ear (for some reason)
- The ludicrous notion was backed up by the ideas of positivism; all criminals have certain
types of ears, and the photographs that they took seemed to prove that
- Misconstrued characteristics as “criminal” with things like race
Rene Magritte’s “ceci n’est pas une pipe” (1929) is telling us that it’s a picture of a pipe, but it’s
not really a pipe, so don’t confuse the representation of the object with the real thing
- Is this the truth? It’s a pipe, but it’s not a pipe. It’s a vicious circle
Roland Barthes: “Myth of photographic truth”
- Two levels of meaning in images
- One is the denotative: the literal, descriptive, the signifier
- Connotative: relies on cultural and historical context and viewers shared
experience or knowledge of those contexts signified
- What happens if we remove the signified from the image?
Robert Franks, Trolley New Orleans (1955)
- Denotative interpretation is people on the bus, people travelling
- Connotative is the difference in generation (different ages depicted), race issues (whites
in the front and blacks in the back), issues regarding work (the man is in workwear
whereas the other people on the bus are dressed more casually)
OJ Simpsons mugshot was darkened for the cover of Times
- Dark skin makes the subject look guilty, so it drove people to read if they thought there
was a scandal
- Someone was able to break down murderers, thieves and arsonists based on their
expression in their mugshot
Ideologies aren’t just religious; they are anything that is shared by a common core group
Signifier + signified = sign
Check d2l for more on this subject
Not all signs are intentional
All signs aren’t shared
Signs can only act as their interpreted sign within the context in which that belief is held
- Rhino horn = wealth
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
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