RMG 300 Study Guide - Final Guide: Wireless Internet Service Provider, Business Process Modeling, Business Process Management

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Published on 20 Apr 2013
School
Ryerson University
Department
Retail Management
Course
RMG 300
Professor
RMG300 STUDY NOTES
CHAPTER ONE: INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND BUSINESS STRATEGY
Benchmarking: The process of continuously measuring system results, comparing
those results to optimal system performance (benchmark values), and
identifying steps and procedures to improve system performance.
Benchmarks: Baseline values the system seeks to attain.
Business-driven information systems: A term used to describe how information systems should be designed
and implemented to support various business initiatives. The premise
for this term is that business initiatives should drive information
systems choices.
Business process: A standardized set of activities that accomplish a specific task, such as
processing a customer’s order.
B2B marketplace: An Internet- based service that brings together many buyers and sellers.
Buyer power: High when buyers have many choices of whom to buy from and low when
their choices are few.
Chief information officer (CIO): Responsible for (1) overseeing all uses of information technology and (2)
ensuring the strategic alignment of IT with business goals and objectives.
Chief knowledge officer (CKO)|Responsible for collecting, maintaining, and
distributing the organization’s knowledge.
Chief privacy officer (CPO): Responsible for ensuring the ethical and legal use of information within an
organization.
Chief security officer (CSO): Responsible for ensuring the security of IT systems and developing strategies
and IT safeguards against attacks from hackers and viruses.
Chief technology officer (CTO): Responsible for ensuring the throughput, speed, accuracy, availability, and
reliability of an organization’s information technology.
Competitive advantage: A product or service that an organization’s customers place a greater value on
than similar offerings from a competitor.
Data: Raw facts that describe the characteristics of an event.
Effectiveness IS metrics: Measures the impact IS has on business processes and activities including
customer satisfaction, conversion rates, and sell-through increases.
Efficiency IS metrics: Measures the performance of the IS system itself including throughput, speed,
and availability.
Environmental scanning: The acquisition and analysis of events and trends in the environment external
to an organization.
First-mover advantage: An organization can significantly impact its market share by being first to
market with a competitive advantage.
Five Forces Model: Helps determine the relative competitive attractiveness of an industry.
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Information: Data converted into a meaningful and useful context.
Information systems (IS): Computer-based tools that people use to work with and that support
the information and information-processing needs of an organization.
Key performance indicators (KPI): Measures that are tied to business drivers.
Knowledge: Actionable information.
Loyalty programs: Reward customers based on the amount of business they do with a
particular organization.
Management information systems (MIS): The function that plans for, develops, implements, and maintains IT
hardware, software, and applications that people use to support the
goals of an organization.
Private exchange: A B2B marketplace in which a single buyer posts its need and then
opens the bidding to any supplier who would care to bid.
Response time: The time it takes to respond to user interactions such as a mouse click.
Reverse auction: An auction format in which increasingly lower bids are solicited from
organizations willing to supply the desired product or service at an
increasingly lower price.
Rivalry among existing competitors: High when competition is fierce in a market and low when
competition is more complacent.
Supplier power: High when buyers have few choices of whom to buy from and low
when their choices are many.
Switching costs: The costs that can make customers reluctant to switch to another
product or service.
System availability: Number of hours a system is available for users.
Threat of new entrants: High when it is easy for new competitors to enter a market and low
when there are significant entry barriers to entering a market.
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Threat of substitute products or services: High when there are many alternatives to a product or service and low
when there are few alternatives from which to choose.
Throughput: The amount of information that can travel through a system at any
point in time.
Transaction speed: Amount of time a system takes to perform a transaction.
Value chain: Views an organization as a series of processes, each of which adds
value to the product or service for each customer.
Web traffic: Includes a host of benchmarks such as the number of page views, the
number of unique visitors, and the average time spent viewing a Web
page.
CHAPTER TWO: DECISION MAKING AND BUSINESS PROCESS
Analytical information: Encompasses all organizational information, and its primary purpose is to
support the performing of managerial analysis tasks.
Artificial intelligence (AI): Simulates human intelligence, such as the ability to reason and learn.
As-Is process models: Represent the current state of the operation that has been mapped, without any
specific improvements or changes to existing processes.
Business facing processes: Invisible to the external customer but essential to the effective management of
the business; include goal setting, day-to-day planning, performance feedback,
rewards, and resource allocation.
Business intelligence: Information that people use to support their decision-making efforts.
Business process improvement: Attempts to understand and measure a business process and make performance
improvements on that process accordingly.
Business process management (BPM): Integrates all of an organization’s business processes to make
individual processes more efficient.
Business process model: A graphic description of a process, showing the sequence of process
tasks, which is developed for a specific purpose and from a selected
viewpoint.
Business process modeling (mapping): The activity of creating a detailed flow chart or process map of a work
process showing its inputs, tasks, and activities, in a structured
sequence.
Business process reengineering (BPR): The analysis and redesign of workflow within and between
enterprises.
Consolidation: Involves the aggregation of information and features simple roll-ups
to complex groupings of interrelated information.
Customer facing processes: The result in a product or service that is received by an organization’s
external customer.
Decision support system (DSS): Models information to support managers and business professionals
during the decision-making process.
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Document Summary

The process of continuously measuring system results, comparing those results to optimal system performance (benchmark values), and identifying steps and procedures to improve system performance. A term used to describe how information systems should be designed and implemented to support various business initiatives. The premise for this term is that business initiatives should drive information systems choices. A standardized set of activities that accomplish a specific task, such as processing a customer"s order. An internet- based service that brings together many buyers and sellers. High when buyers have many choices of whom to buy from and low when their choices are few. Responsible for (1) overseeing all uses of information technology and (2) ensuring the strategic alignment of it with business goals and objectives. Chief knowledge officer (cko)|responsible for collecting, maintaining, and distributing the organization"s knowledge. Responsible for ensuring the ethical and legal use of information within an organization.

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