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ADM2337- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 86 pages long!)


Department
Administration
Course Code
ADM 2337
Professor
Magda Donia
Study Guide
Final

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UOttawa
ADM2337
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Chapter 2 Strategy and Human Resources Planning
STRATEGIC PLANNING AND HUMAN RESOURCES
Strategic Planning Procedures for making decisions about the organization’s long-term
goals and strategies.
Human Resources Planning (HRP) The process of anticipating and providing for the
movement of people into, within, and out of an organization.
Overall, its purpose is to help managers deploy their human resources as effectively
as possible, where and when they are needed, to accomplish the organization’s
goals.
Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRM) The pattern of human resources
deployments and activities that enable an organization to achieve its strategic goals.
STRATEGIC PLANNING AND HR PLANNING: LINKING THE PROCESSES
HRP relates to strategic planning on a fundamental level for two issues:
Strategy formulation
o What is possible; whether a firm has the types and numbers of people
available to pursue a given strategy.
Strategy implementation
o Once the firm has devised its strategy, the company’s executives must make
resource allocation decisions to implement that strategy, including decisions
related to the firm’s structure, processes and human capital.
STEP 1: MISSION, VISION AND VALUES
Mission The basic purpose of the organization as well as its scope of operations.
Often written in terms of general clients the organization services.
Ex. The mission of Google is to organize the world’s information and make it
universally accessible and useful.
Strategic Vision A statement about where the company is going and what it can become
in the future; clarifies the long-term direction of the company and its strategic intent.
A perspective on where the company is headed and what the organization can
become in the future.
Core Values The strong and enduring beliefs and principles that the company uses as a
foundation for its decisions.
Underlying parameters for how the company will act toward customers, employees
and the public in general.
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Underlying philosophy of the company culture and give direction to its employees.
STEP 2: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS
The mission, vision and values drive the second component of the strategic management
process: analysis of external opportunities and threats.
Environmental Scanning Systematic monitoring of the major external forces influencing
the organization.
The six most highly monitoring external issues are:
1. Economic factors and envelopment information, including general, regional and
global conditions.
2. Industry and competitive trends, including new processes, services and innovations.
3. Technological changes, including information technology, innovations and
automation.
4. Government and legislative issues, including laws and administrative rulings,
5. Social concerns, including childcare, elder care, the environment and educational
priorities.
6. Demographic and labour market trends, including the age, composition and literacy
of the labour market and immigration.
COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT
Five forces in the competitive environment:
New entrants
o To protect a company’s position in an industry, companies often try to
establish entry barriers to keep new firms out.
o When new firms do enter an industry it is often because they have a different
and perhaps better way to provide customer value.
Customers
o Identifying the needs of customers.
o Creating customer value and different customers often want different things.
o Actions and attitudes that lead to excellent customer service can include:
Speed of delivering normal orders.
Willingness to meet extraordinary needs.
Merchandise delivered in good condition.
Readiness to take back defective goods and resupply new goods
quickly.
Availability of installation and repair services and parts.
Substitutes
o Ex. Telephone industry, landline versus mobile.
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