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ECO244Y5 (14)

Week 14

6 Pages
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Department
Economics
Course Code
ECO244Y5
Professor
Reid/ Curran

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Week 14:
Lecture Slides:
#8: Uses of Job Analysis information
#9: Steps in Job Analysis
#11: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information – Qualitative
#15: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis information – Quantitative
#18: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information – Quantitative
#19: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information – Quantitative
#22: Writing Job Descriptions and Sob Specifications
#23: Job Description Information
#25: Job Descriptions and Human Rights Legislation
Textbook:
Uses of Job Analysis Information
Job analysis is sometimes called the cornerstone of HRM. As illustrated in Figure 4.3, the information
gathered, evaluated, and summarized through job analysis is the basis for a number of interrelated HRM
activities.
Human Resources Planning
oKnowing the actual requirements of jobs is essential for planning future staffing needs.
When this information is combined with knowledge about the skills and qualifications of
current employees, it is possible to determine which jobs can be filled internally and
which will require external recruitment
Recruitment and Selection
oThe job description and job specification information should be used to decide what sort
of person to recruit and hire. Identifying bona fide occupational requirements and
ensuring that all activities related to recruitment and selection (such as advertising,
screening, and testing) are based on these requirements is necessary for legal compliances
in all Canadian jurisdictions.
Compensation
oJob analysis information is also essential for determining the relative value of and
appropriate compensation for each job. Job evaluation should be based on the required
skills, physical and mental demands, responsibilities, and working conditions all
assessed through job analysis. The relative value of jobs is one of the key factors used to
determine appropriate compensation and justify pay differences if challenged under
human rights or pay equity legislation. Information about the actual job duties is also
necessary to determine whether a job qualifies for overtime-pay and maximum-hours
purposes, as specified in employment standards legislation.
Performance Appraisal
oTo be legally defensible, the criteria used to assess employee performance must be
directly related to the duties and responsibilities identified through job analysis. For many
jobs involving routine tasks, especially those of a quantifiable nature, performance
standards are determined through job analysis. For more complex job s, performance
standards are often jointly established by employees and their supervisors. To be realistic
and achievable, such standards should be based on actual job requirements as identified
through job analysis.
Labour Relations
oIn unionized environments, the job descriptions developed from the job analysis
information are generally subject to union approval before being finalized. Such union-
approved job descriptions then become the basis for classifying jobs and bargaining over
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wages, performance criteria, and working conditions. Once approved, significant changes
to job descriptions may have been negotiated.
Training, Development, and Career Management
oBy comparing the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) that employees bring to the job
with those that are identified by job analysis, managers can determine gaps that require
training programs. Having accurate information about jobs also means that employees can
prepare for future advancements by identifying gaps between their current KSAs and
those specified for the jobs to which they aspire.
Job Design
oJob analysis is useful for ensuring that all of the duties having to be done have actually
been assigned and for identifying areas of overlap. Also, having an accurate description of
each job sometimes leads to the identification of unnecessary requirements, areas of
conflict or dissatisfaction, and/or health and safety concerns that can be eliminated
through job redesign. Such redesign may increase morale and productivity and ensuring
compliance with human rights and occupational health and safety regulations.
Steps in Job Analysis
Step 1 :
oIdentify the use to which the information will be put, since this will determine the
types of data that would be collected and the techniques used. Some data collection
techniques such as interviewing the employee and asking what the job entails and what
his or her responsibilities are - are good for writing job descriptions and selecting
employees for the job. Other job analysis techniques provided numerical ratings for each
job, which can be used to compare jobs for compensation purposes.
Step 2 :
oReview relevant background information, such as organization charts, process charts,
and existing job descriptions. A process chart shoes the flow of inputs to and outputs
form the job under study. (In Figure 4.4, the inventory control clerk is expected to receive
inventory from the suppliers, take requests for inventory from the two plant managers,
provide requested inventory to those managers, and give information to the plant
accountant on the status of in-stock inventories.)
Step 3 :
oSelect the representative position and jobs to be analyzed. This selection is necessary
when there are many incumbents in a single job and when a number of similar jobs are to
be analyzed because it would be too time-consuming to analyze every position and job.
Step 4 :
oNext, analyze the jobs by collecting data on job activities, required employee
behaviours, working conditions, and human traits and abilities needed to perform the job,
and using one or more of the job analysis techniques explained later in this chapter.
Step 5 :
oReview the information with job incumbents. The job analysis information should be
verified with any workers performing the job and with the immediate supervisor. This
corroboration will help to confirm that the information is factually correct and complete,
and it can also help gain the employees acceptance of the job analysis data.
Step 6 :
oDevelop a job description and job specification, which are the two concrete products of
the job analysis.
Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information:
Various qualitative and quantitative techniques are used to collect information about the duties,
responsibilities, and requirements of the job; the most important ones will be discussed in this section. In
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Description
Week 14: Lecture Slides: #8: Uses of Job Analysis information #9: Steps in Job Analysis #11: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information Qualitative #15: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis information Quantitative #18: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information Quantitative #19: Methods of Collecting Job Analysis Information Quantitative #22: Writing Job Descriptions and Sob Specifications #23: Job Description Information #25: Job Descriptions and Human Rights Legislation Textbook: Uses of Job Analysis Information Job analysis is sometimes called the cornerstone of HRM. As illustrated in Figure 4.3, the information gathered, evaluated, and summarized through job analysis is the basis for a number of interrelated HRM activities. Human Resources Planning o Knowing the actual requirements of jobs is essential for planning future staffing needs. When this information is combined with knowledge about the skills and qualifications of current employees, it is possible to determine which jobs can be filled internally and which will require external recruitment Recruitment and Selection o The job description and job specification information should be used to decide what sort of person to recruit and hire. Identifying bona fide occupational requirements and ensuring that all activities related to recruitment and selection (such as advertising, screening, and testing) are based on these requirements is necessary for legal compliances in all Canadian jurisdictions. Compensation o Job analysis information is also essential for determining the relative value of and appropriate compensation for each job. Job evaluation should be based on the required skills, physical and mental demands, responsibilities, and working conditions all assessed through job analysis. The relative value of jobs is one of the key factors used to determine appropriate compensation and justify pay differences if challenged under human rights or pay equity legislation. Information about the actual job duties is also necessary to determine whether a job qualifies for overtime-pay and maximum-hours purposes, as specified in employment standards legislation. Performance Appraisal o To be legally defensible, the criteria used to assess employee performance must be directly related to the duties and responsibilities identified through job analysis. For many jobs involving routine tasks, especially those of a quantifiable nature, performance standards are determined through job analysis. For more complex job s, performance standards are often jointly established by employees and their supervisors. To be realistic and achievable, such standards should be based on actual job requirements as identified through job analysis. Laboor In unionized environments, the job descriptions developed from the job analysis information are generally subject to union approval before being finalized. Such union- approved job descriptions then become the basis for classifying jobs and bargaining over www.notesolution.com
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