Exam Notes ENGB50.pdf

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Department
English
Course
ENGB07H3
Professor
M.Hoffmann- Universityof Toronto
Semester
Fall

Description
Exam Notes ENGB50 December-11-12 6:16 PM  Marie de France: Yonec - There's little known about her - Oral transmission of story - Story about courtly love, tower trope, and gothic - Woman was a mal-mariee - wasn't worthy of marrying him, not of a high station - Sister in law contrasts her, like the Yellow Wallpaper ○ Old woman, who is barren, and widowed - Son is like Jesus figure, meant to avenge his mother's death at the festival  Julian of Norwich: Book of Showings - Was an anchoresses, which caused her hallucinations - Wrote about God the Father, Mother and God ○ Made god more approachable by making it a woman - You had to petition to be an anchorite - really nut jobs who were physically and verbally silenced  Queen Elizabeth I: Speech to the Troops at Tilbury - Written during the renaissance - Oral tradition, so the copy may not be word-for-word - Demonstrates her devotion to her people by referring to herself as one of them - approachable ○ "My" people, repeats this ○ This is a battle against her god, her people and her kingdom - Heart of a king, body of a woman - both strong and feable - Royal we only refers to her  Mary Herbert: To the Thrice-Sacred Queen - It was popular to have the queen as a muse - many women were muses ○ Because of her wit and wisdom, and sharp intelligence ○ More than human - Herbert comes from an aristocratic family ○ Her brother was Philip Sidney, a famous poet - reinforced national identity in his theories - In the poem she refers to the queen as a ruler, muse, and saint - This prefaced a series of palms her brother was writing  Aphra Behn: Oroonoko - Aphra Behn was a supporter of Charles II - and he supported the arts ○ Worked for him as a spy, and he promised to pay her, but didn't so she was stuck as an ex patriot - Literate, but didn't have the skills of aristocrats ○ First woman to make money off of her writing - mostly theatre work, didn't see the success of her novels - Oroonoko is a novella, biography, and travel narrative ○ The narrator has an ethnocentric, European perspective - and a woman - Discusses slavery and the noble savage/ exotic other ○ Oroonoko and Imoinda are compared to Mars and Venus; Roman gods; European intelligence - Language of the eyes - emphasis on the visual since talking was dangerous  Hanna More: The Slave Trade - Wrote 100 yrs after Behn - demonstrates the tradition and lineage - Concept of wit - Believed that men and women should be in different spheres to protect women, not thinking backwards ○ She was interested in women's education but also knew that they wouldn't be able to get far - The poem starts with how song keeps slaves connected - Speaks of tension, truth and imagination ○ Also important to Behn and Oroonoko - and specifically referred to him - Tension between body and mind - should be the same, but have different capabilities - Men were deities not slaves (Egyptian and Roman history) - Men were deities not slaves (Egyptian and Roman history) - Visual description of slavery at end  Aphra Behn: To the Fair Clarinda, Who made love to me, imagined more than woman - Taking on both gender roles, outside of the traditional norm- examples of both male and female ○ Unashamed of feelings because seems like no risk of getting caught - They're taboo but still virgins - Meant as "best friends" poem, but contemporary reading seems overly sexual  Eliza Haywood: Fantomina - Performance narrative, about the body and consumption ○ She has 4 personas: Fantomina, Celia, Widow Bloomer and Incognita ○ Performance involves visual and acting ○ Her disguises and names are calculated - Wit versus Beauty - usually you have one OR the other, she had both, and was very lucky - Public versus Private spheres - Fallen woman - sent to France, where no one will ever know who she is - have her baby  Anna Letitia Barbauld - She wrote for children and political interest ○ She was a teacher and politically charged - Wrote during French Revolution - fear that it would spread to England - Didn't agree with female education, because she knew the mentality of thepublic/private sphere, but didn't agree with it  The rights of women - Original was destroyed - Obviously doesn't apply to ALL women, only the privileged ○ Response to Wollstonecraft's work, but more about the here and now - politics of women's rights - Mocking what's going, because she knows that if you tell women straight they won't give it to you ○ You have to do it round about - reverse psychology  Washing-Day - Rebels against traditional roles of women because it's such a burden and boring - Becomes a personal story, then traditions to discussing the bubbles ○ Bubbles rise up and can float away - they're free ○ It's like the shape of the earth, but like the ocean - it's everything but doesn't have burdens ○ Compared to the yoke, which restricts women  Epistle to William Wilberforce - Represents her belief that slave trade needs to be abolished - Personifies mercy and freedom by capitalizing them - concepts are tied - About wit- worth parts and eloquence - African slaves will get revenge - contrasts the pastoral with slavery image ○ Based on senses - both need to work and toil, but one is cheerful - If one person says slavery is okay, everyone will- Britain's morals are corrupted by colonialism ○ Slavery hasn’t been overcome! She insults them to wake them up  Frances Burney: the diary and letters of Madame D'Arblay - Wrote Evelina (epistolary novel) - Felt that writing would hurt women's marriage prospects - The letters are introspective - popular at the time; talk about yourself but don't make up stories - Written to her sister as an autobiography; way of writing ahistory of the time (like Oroonoko) - She wrote as if she traveled, women loved to meet her, and she was "demure" about it - She points out other women's inadequacies- they want happy endings and letters of gossip - Get's detailed about her surgery and cannot understand what's serious since she looks fine - She's awake during her surgery, since there's no pain meds - Her husband supported her in all ways- writing and pain  Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility - Originally called Elinor (Sense) and Marianne (Sensibility) - Place and space are very important - the women are in appropriately public spaces for their gender ○ Big house =
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