PSYA01 Chapters 1 -3.docx

9 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens
Semester
Fall

Description
1.3 PUTTING PSYCHOLOGY TO WORK: CAREERS IN PSYCHOLOGY AND RELATED FIELDS • research psychologists ­ typically work at universities, in corporations, in the military  and in governmental agencies • applied psychology ­ uses psychological knowledge to address problems and issues  across various settings and professions, including law, education, clinical psychology, and  business organization and management (some do both basic and applied work) • psychiatry ­ a branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of mental and  behavioural disorders (can prescribe meds) • forensic psychology ­ encompasses work in the criminal justice system, including  interactions with the legal system and its professionals • school psychology ­ involves working with students who have special needs, such as  those with emotional, social, or academic problems   • health psychology ­ also known as behavioural medicine, is the study of how individual,  biological and environmental factors affect physical health • industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology ­ a branch of applied psychology in  which psychologist work for businesses and other organizations to improve employee  productivity and the organizational structure or the company or business (human factor) 2.1 PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH • objectivity ­ assumes that certain facts about the world can be observed and tested independently  from the individual (ie. the scientist) who describes them • five characteristics of quality scientific research: (1) it is based on measurements that are  objective , valid, and reliable  (2) it can be generalized  (3) it uses techniques that reduce bias  (4)  it is made public  (5) it can be replicated • objective measurements ­ the measure of an entity or behaviour that, within an allowed margin  of error is consistent across instruments and observers  • variable ­ refers to the object, concept pr event being measured • self­reporting ­ a method in which responses are provided directly by the people who are being  studied, typically through face to face interviews, phone surveys, paper and pencil tests and web­ based questionnaires  • operational definitions ­ are statements that describe the procedures (or operations) and specific  measures that are used to record observations • reliability ­ when it provides consistent and stable answers across multiple observations and  points in time • validity ­ the degree to which an instrument or procedure actually measures what it claims to  measure • generalizability ­ refers to the degree to which one set of results can be applied to other  situations, individuals or events • population ­ the group that researchers want to generalize about • random sample ­ every individual of a population has an equal chance of being included • convenience samples ­ which are samples of individuals who are the most readily available  • ecological validity ­ is the degree to which the results of a laboratory study can be applied to or  repeated in the natural environment • hawthorne effect ­ is a term used to describe situations in which behaviour changes as a result of  being observed  • social desirability ­ (also known as socially desirable responding) means that research  participants respond in ways that increase the chances that they will be viewed favourably  • placebo effect ­ a measurable and experienced improvement in health or behaviour that cannot be  attributed to a medication or treatment • single blind study ­ the participants do not know the true purpose of the study, or else do not  know which type of treatment they are receiving (ex. placebo or drug) • double blind study ­ which either the participants nor the experimenter knows the exact  treatment for any individual • peer reviews ­ a process in which papers submitted for publication in scholarly journals are read  and critiqued by experts in the specific field of study  • replication ­ is the process of repeating a study and finding a similar outcome each time  • anecdotal evidence ­ an individual's story or testimony about an observation or event that is used  to make a claim as evidence  • appeal to authority ­ the belief in an 'expert's' claim even when no supporting data or scientific  evidence is present • appeal to common sense ­ a claim that appeals to be sound, but lacks supporting scientific  evidence  2.2 SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH DESIGNS  • case study ­ an in­depth report about the details of a specific case • naturalistic observation ­ they unobtrusively observe and record behaviour as it occurs in the  subject's natural environment • correlational research ­ involves measuring the degree of association between two or more  variables • random assignment ­ a technique for dividing samples into two or more groups  •  confounding variables ­ variables outside of the researcher's control that might affect the results • dependent variable ­ which is the observation or measurement that is recorded during the  experiment and subsequently compared across all groups • independent variable ­ the variable that the experimenter manipulates to distinguish between the  two groups • experimental group ­ the group in the experiment that is exposed to the independent variable  • control group ­ does not receive the treatment and therefore serves as a comparison • quasi­experimental research ­ a research technique in which the two or more groups that are  compared are selected based on predetermined characteristics rather than random assignment  2.3 ETHICS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH  • institutional review board (IRB) ­ a committee of researchers and officials at an insertion  charged with the protection of human research participants  • possible cognitive and memorial stress during psychological research: o morality salience ­ participants are made more aware of death, tends to be short term o writing about upsetting or traumatic experiences ­ self explanatory, tends to actual help  the person, as expressing feelings can be good for a person • informed consent ­ a potential volunteer must be informed and give consent without pressure • deception ­ misleading or only partially informing participants of the true topic or hypothesis  under investigation  • debriefing ­ meaning that the researchers should explain the true nature of the study and  especially the nature of and reason for the deception  • how modern psychologist determine whether full consent is given: o freedom to choose ­ should not be at risk of financial loss, physical harm or damage to  their reputation if they choose not to participate o equal opportunities ­ should have choices, should not be required to participate, ie. credit  requirement  o the right to withdraw ­ should be able to drop out of the study whenever, without penalty  o the right to withhold responses ­ should not have to answer any questions they are  uncomfortable responding to  • scientist must keep data safe and must be honest with their data 3.1 GENETIC AND EVOLUTIONARY PRESPECTIVES ON BEHAVIOUR  • Genes ­ the basic unit of heredity that is responsible for guiding the process of creating the  proteins that make up the body's physical structures, and regulating development and  physiological process throughout the life span • Chromosomes ­ structures in the cellular nucleus that are lined with all of the genes an individual  inherits  • DNA ­ (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules formed in a double helix shape that contain four amino  acids: adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine • Genotype ­ the genetic makeup of an organism  • Phenotype ­ the observable characteristics of an organism, including physical structure and  behaviour  • Behavioural genetics ­ the study of how genes and environment influence behaviour  • Monozygotic twins • Dizygotic twins ­ twins who were conceived by two different eggs and twp different sperm, but  still shared the same womb, also known as fraternal twins  • Heritability ­ a statistic, expressed as a number between 0 and 1 that represents the degree to  which genetic differences between individual contribute to individual differences in a behaviour  or trait found in the population  • Behavioural genomics ­ the study of how specific genes, in their interactions with the  environment, influence behaviour  • Evolution ­ the change in frequency of genes occurring in the interbreeding population over  generations  • Natural selection ­ a primary mechanism for evolutionary change, the process by which  favourable traits become increasingly common in a population of interbreeding individuals while  traits that are unfavourable become less common  3.2 PSYCHOLOGY­ HOW THE NE
More Less

Related notes for PSYA01H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit