BCH 447 final.docx

6 Pages
149 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biochemistry
Course
BCH447H1
Professor
Larry Moran
Semester
Spring

Description
Final Exam Why have cultures independently fixed the same mutations in lenskis experiment: Describe that lenskis experiment placed bacteria under glucose starvation which induced selection  for individuals that could utilize the low glucose more efficiently. Since we know that random genetic drift is always occurring, it is not a surprise that mutations  were found in the genes of the bacteria. But, asking the question why common genes were  mutated to give the same phenotype is a function of the fitness pressures in the  environment.  Describe that it would be logical, that as random genetic drift progressed, mutations that permited  better glucose utilization also enabled that organisms expansion. This is to say, that as  random genetic drift occurred, by chance, a mutation in a glucose utilization gene (that  perhaps increased the energy production of glucose) enabled one bacterial species to expand  significantly, thereby becoming a majority in that flasks population.  11/12 flasks had mutations in the rbs, spot, and malt genes. Ribose utilization operon, activator of  operon transcription, and Malt T which is important for 6 carbon uptake. Bacteria feeding  on the dead.  It is plausible that each of these genes can be mutated in a number of ways to increase function, as  such, each of the cultures, upon correct modification of these genes through random genetic  drift, went under the pressure of natural selection, and were strongly selected for. So, at the  end, we see 11 flasks, with cultures that have genetics that look very different from each  other due to random genetic drift, but have mutations in certain proteins, that permit for  better glucose utilization.  As described in class, the selection for bacteria under antibiotic pressure is about 1. 2S, which  means that about 200% of the time, what is selected for will be fixed. Boom.  Why did only one of the cultures evolve the cit+ phenotype. Unfortunately, this question has not been completely answered. But speculations do manifest in this  case. Firstly  Since we know that random genetic drift is always occurring, it is not a surprise that mutations  were found in the genes of the bacteria. But if random genetic drift is so common it is hard to imagine that this had any effect on the cit +  phenotype. To account for this discrepancy the idea of contingency manifested. Contingency  states that what we see know is predefined by what has occurred before. It is assumed that  perhaps, previous mutations, in certain genetic sequences... or perhaps a previous mutation  in one of the genes required for glucose uptake improvement may have been different  enough from the other 11 flasks, that it influenced a completely new type of mutation. As  such, leading to the cit+ phenotype.  In lenskis paper the assumption is that there could be three modes by which this phenotype could  have arisen if we assume that contingency is in effect... By accident, because of a previous  mutation that influenced this one... or by epistatic effects. Whereby, two genes had to be  mutated and their interactions together enforced the function of Cit+. Unfortunately, so far, they have not been able to deduce the genes inducing the cit+ phenotype.  They were able to show though that only species from the cit+ flask that were isolasted at  aqbout 3150 generations were able to evolve the cit+ phenotype, meaning that a genetic  influence is very likely.  Regarding the actual mutation itself the cit+ phenotype underwent potentiation, refinement and  actualization. It was potentiated by contingency. In actualization we got cit+ but it wasn’t  very efficient, and in refinement, we likely got gene duplications to  make the cit use really  good.  What is contingency and wwhy is it important to understand evolution. Write  everything you wrote in the lenskii section. Plus discuss contingency as a whole. Why do we need sex when bacteria are fine. Sex was a way to outcompete the  asexual population? Eukaryotes need sex so that they can have mixis, or mixing of genes. Gene shuffling, leading to the  heterozygote advantage,  Genetic recombination to decrease linkage disequilibrium. Increased probability of having functional offspring.  The above are some of the reasons for the maintenance of sex although they all suffer from flaws,  one of which is that it seems as though sex is selecting for the future... something that cannot  happen. Secondly arguments like genetic recombination are also debated.  Now, bacteria are not in need of genetic sharing if you will because of their fast generation time. I  mean, e­coli produce a new generation in approximately 8 hours. Meaning that even if some  slightly detrimental gene was produced random genetic drift would be likely to remodify it  within maybe 100 generations or so. But for humans, with a generation time of 28 years. If  there is a detriment to the offspring it could have significant effects on its ability to survive  within the environment. My argument is a little primitive, but i call on the reader to use  imagination here. As the generation time of an organism increases, so does the need for  heterozygosity.... which manifests significantly from sex. . Now, i want to state that this question is flawed too. We cannot say that the exchange of genes is not  required in bacteria... or else it would not manifest. Therefore, genetic heterozygosity is just  as important in baxcteria as in eukaryotes... its simply too seemingly different modes of  genetic transfer that are designed to cause the same result.  Bacteria can undergo  conjugation, transformation and transduction mechanisms to spread dna.  Norman pace and eukaryotes:  This all dep
More Less

Related notes for BCH447H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit