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HUMA 1625- Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 58 pages long!)


Department
Humanities
Course Code
HUMA 1625
Professor
Sherry J.F.Rowley
Study Guide
Midterm

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York
HUMA 1625
Midterm EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Group Thesis
We theorize that a person’s identity directly reflects that tenets of the dominant cultural
fantasies they reside under. Furthermore, we posit that this notion of exploited by the
privileged members of a given society in order to meet their own needs and strive off of
the oppression of the socially marginalized. We intend to veraciously dissect current
issues plaguing Western society, namely: cultural appropriation, overt racism,
homophobia, and the disdain towards feminine personalities.
Groups Arguments
An individual’s identity is based on the way society perceives them
Social roles A set of expectations other known as deviant roles, enforced and
created not as individuals, but by society
Group arguments are limited due to lack of communication and a late member addition to
the group.
Individual segment of assignment
Due to the lack of communication of the group, I was not assigned a specific issue to
discuss regarding identity. Therefore, I chose a topic that relates to the group theme; A
Canadians identity is shaped by deviant roles, not their race
Individual Thesis
Although Canadians culture celebrates and promotes ethnic and cultural diversity, social
norms around the globe attribute Canadians identity to a White-European racial
background. This attribute is not only wrong, but misidentifies and marginalize or
exclude Canadians that do not meet the expected image
Individuals Arguments
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Biologically (race has no biological relationship to our traits, no biological gene for
race, definitions of what creates race have changed over time Understand race
biologically and socially), Socially (race exist as a social category, race is used as a tool
of power, race was created to distinguish status and create racism
Compare Aboriginals to Immigrated Canadians
Assumption of what a Canadian look like (white, European decent) Image of ‘How
Canadian are you?” (Mcmahon, Kohler and Sniderman) (google search). I wfirstill
compare the imagines of individuals from this search with the bloodline Canadians.
If an individual were to technically examine Canadians as a race, the only true
Canadian people would be First Nation’s people (Everyone else’s ancestors are all
immigrants to Canada, making their bloodline None-Canadian).
When searching ‘Canadian’ in google images, there is 50 photos with no relation to
aboriginals
When searching ‘Canadian person’ in google images, there is photos of celebrities
and one aboriginal in the first 20 photos
Demonstrating the difficulty of being identified as a Canadian while being of another
race
Canadian’s identity is created and disseminated throughout society (Ads, media,
billboards) Individuals with a different ethnic background than ones presented
to society will have a difficult time showing their nationality (the question of,
“Oh, where are you actually from”) This also demonstrates that the idea of what a
Canadian should look like is a common and universal image
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