Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
York (10,000)
MGMT (100)
Study Guide

[MGMT 1030] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (33 pages long)


Department
Management
Course Code
MGMT 1030
Professor
Andrew Thomson
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 33 pages of the document.
York
MGMT 1030
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

The Diversit of Industrial Eperience
Cabinet and Furniture Manufacture in Late Nineteenth-Century
Ontario
The Cabinet and Furniture Manufacture illustrates the diversity of paths to
industrialization
Compared to the United States:
o Complex and unpredictable demand
o Smaller markets
o Lower incomes
Small and unpowered workshops remained competitive throughout the 19th and 20th c.
Distinct Canadian industrial experience
Reflects the unique interaction of local demand and supply
They competed with mechanized furniture factories
Survival of small and unpowered enterprises and the continued coexistence
of diverse technologies and scales of production were not unique to furniture
manufacture or to Canada
Small firms were as part of the revolution as any other familiar symbols
Paradox: If large-scale enterprise brought such large and increasing advantages, how
did so many small producers manage to survive?
Varies with industry and region
Answer for CDN furniture markets lies in the nature of the demand for
furniture and in the peculiarities of local society
Wood in Ontario’s Industrial Revolution
When? The late 19th century
What? Ontario was in the middle of an economic transformation, which was changing
production structure, and how people earned money
New challenges existed because of new technology and the increasingly
complex circumstances
Woods price was rising, so there was a focus on alternative sources of fuel
and materials (like coal, petroleum and electricity)
Peculiarities
Ontarios economy changed at a slower pace than nearby U.S. regions
The scale of business enterprise and levels of income and productivity also
lagged
Wood was continually important to the Canadian economy
o Preindustrial and as an industrial raw material (for energy and
consumption)
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

o Estimates of woods share price confirm
Wooden Age
18th and 19th centuries
Forestry contributed about 1/10th of all income in each of the eastern
Canadian provinces
While industrialization in other environments signaled a shift away from the
use of wood, in Ontario, the growth of manufacturing and the experience of
the industrial revolution depended as much on wood as on the new materials
and chemicals
Working with wood was overwhelmingly a male activity
Larger firms in the cabinet and furniture industry employed many women in
their upholstery rooms
Saw mills were the most rural of the wood-based establishments
Sash and door markers, cabinet and furniture shops, and carpenters
operated in more urban locations
Larger shops
o Tended to be more situation in more urban locations
o Operated for a longer portion of the year
Saw mills operated a little over ½ of the year
In most other industries, workshops operated 10/11 months
Records show considerable variations in the sources of industrial power
Source of
power
How much
powered Sawmills
How much powered
sash and door shops
How much powered
cabinet and furniture shops
Water or steam
Most or all
A little more than half
¼
Almost no carpenters and few coopers and carriage makers (event large
ones) used mechanical power
Establishments could be large without using mechanical power
manufactories
Larger establishments tended to use mechanical power, tended to choose
steam over water power
Complex correlation between size and power reflects the ability of a large
establishment to absorb the costs of a steam plant and perhaps also their
greater profitability and ability to grow
Importance of year-round activity to the successful use of steam also
contributed, because urban plants tended to be larger
During the 1870s and 1880s- the size of the wood-using sector increased
considerably
Reflects the growth in:
o The number of workers
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version