Study Guides (248,516)
Canada (121,604)
York University (10,209)
NATS 1840 (18)
Quiz

QUIZ 5.docx

13 Pages
143 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Natural Science
Course
NATS 1840
Professor
Ian Slater
Semester
Winter

Description
NATS 1840 – Lecture 13 – The Automobile  The Automobile Today Most successful technology: massmanufactured and everyone uses them ­ The automobile is pervasive & integrated in North America – pervasive: millions owned and  manufactured at a time. Integrated: mixed in with our lives, work, eating, all social practices we do  outside the car we do it inside.  ­ Pervasive: millions \owned, millions produced  ­ Integrated: many social activities pursued in cars ­ restrictions on use: licensing and cost of operation – must buy a car, easy to get a hold of  discounted rates for used cars,  ­ Cars are intertwined with pop culture, North American values; individual freedom, economic  prosperity, sign of adulthood – songs about cars, movies, books, wrapped in our culture, tied in with  north American values – first big purchase. Culturally and socially significant ­ motor vehicle, urbanization and suburbanization, personal mobility, distribution of goods – cities  shaped by the cars, cant get around without access to a vehicle, cities built with the assumption of  access to a car ­> cant get to the city from the suburbs without one, get around easily with What’s the Problem? ­ Internal combustion engine, burn gasoline, cause greenhouse gasses: BIGGEST ISSUE ­ Environmentalism in the modern world, problem of mass production, individual action: individual  cars do not pollute that much but because of mass production: causes aggregate problems on  environment. Individual tech that make small contribute to the problem so individuals do not want to  change to make a big impact ­ Individual car pollution, millions of cars, aggregation of damage ­ Individual contribution small, altering usage difficult ­ Exhaust as an environmental and health problem: parts the pollution is so bad that its hard to  breath ­ technological fix or a social fix ­ A technological fix – design change to tech (hybrid, electric), social fix – using technology  differently (carpooling, transit) ­ Technological fixes, technical difficultly, social fixes, habit: changes how tech is used, using it in  different ways eg carpooling, habit­ part of a social fix, it is difficult changing behavior, less  preferred and more challenging The History of the Electric Car  ­ Electric, gas & steam cars, turn of century  ­ 1898 a New York Sun article stated that, At that busy corner, Grand Street and the Bowery, there may be seen cars propelled by five  different methods of propulsion – by steam, by cable, by underground trolley, by storage battery  and by horses. [Kirsch, 11] (before internal combustion cars) ­ 1885 Gottlieb Daimler & Carl Benz, liquid benzene fuel for cars: first proof of internal combustion  (controlled expolsion of energy) ­ 1887, Rudolph Diesel, compressed fuel injection ( to make it more efficient) ­ Commercial electric and steam cars predated gasoline powered cars ­ First electric car in 1894, electric cabs in NY in 1897  The Competition ­ horse & automobile horse was primary way of transportation  ­ Horses and human transportation since early civilization th ­ 19  century: horses were part of a supply chain, trains for long distance transport, horses for local  transport ­ Horse carriages were mass produced technologies much like cars were later. ­ 7 million horses in the US in 1860, over 25 million in 1900 ­ in 1900, horse density in major urban centres was approximately 426 horses per square mile,  stables (infrastructure) on almost every block ­ In addition, there were over 15,000 horse carcasses per year in city streets: couple dying  everyday and would get picked up after a couple days ­ Roads with horse traffic treated as places to be, not places to pass through: children played on  the roads as nothing was moving that fast until cars were introduced ­ however, there were costs to all of this:  ­ between 800,000 and 1.3 million pounds of manure each day in New York City: public health  issue as rats, bugs were attracted, disease spread, health hazard thus automobile were presented  as a technological fix ­ Automobile, technological fix  ­ Automobiles expensive to operate, work in the heat and cold (horses don’t), further and faster  than horse ­ Automobiles and horses worked alongside in military and commerce, WWII, still used in rural and  poor (farming) How Did the Designs Stack Up? Steam Cars ­ Lighter, high pressure & temperature : this makes it super efficient, the high the temp and  pressure the better the engine will run and more efficient but these have tendencies to blow up ­ Steamboat, train boiler explosions 1800’s, stigma ­ advantages: Steam flexible , used different kinds of fuel: gasoline, kerosene, wood or coal  ­ needs Pure water, clogging,  in the end it is unreliable, expensive to fix, and too dangerous Electric Cars ­ Electric engine flexibility, 2­3X rated power (hills, mud), gasoline engine might  stall (in the  beginning, not anymore) ­ Stopped & restarted easily, commercial use (used for deliverys or drop offs  ­ Fueling (to charge), technical & organizational challenges ­ 1909 over 4000 central charging stations over United States  ­ Standardization of technology was poor, charging technology was unreliable ­ Electric industry ignored the electric car, thought it was vanity technology as only the rich could  afford it. People would tour but simply a toy for rich people, thus electric industry did nto  standardize the technology  ­ Batteries: limited storage capacity, charging times varied  ­ Long distance rail shipping by train, local by automobile, (commercial) electric cars sufficient for  goods from train drop off to the store ­ Markets expanded and cities expanded, greater range of internal combustion advantage ­ Electric motors: frequent small adjustments by experts (not easy to fix on your own)(thus disliked) ­ Private clients, speed, range & performance from automobiles, commercial clients wanted cost­ effectiveness and a respectable range thus bought electric cars Internal Combustion Cars ­ Internal combustion engines initially less reliable & efficient than steam and electric cars ­ Internal combustion lighter,achieve higher speeds, more accidents, wear and tear, social menace  as it slaughtered citizens due to speed, initially constant breakdowns but simpler than electric cars,  easier to fix yourself ­ Simpler to fix, little technical knowledge  ­ Sensitive to fuel impurities, engine problems until fuel standardized (fuel wasn’t refined, thus more  stalling and engine problem) ­ Gasoline & kerosene widely available, heating and lighting initially the lack of gas stations did not  matter ­ Long distance touring (private users), before gas stations  ­ Infrastructure investment not needed in the beginning Gasoline as a Fuel ­ Mid­1800’s, oil in US, chemical analysis at university, commercial applications – ppl realized oil  could be used for any diff apllications so they started to play around with it ­ Early 1900’s, electric lighting replacing kerosene, need for new demand for oil; oil supported  gasoline for the internal combustion cars  ­ Gasoline: low flash point and a high temperature of combustion; easy to light and  burns really hot; dangerous to sit around ­ Oil has complex, heavy, long chain molecules, “cracked” or broken down to produce lighter  kerosene and gasoline (process of heating it and breaking it down) ­ By 1911, chemists developed methods to crack petroleum, high temperatures and pressures ­ eliminated “knock”, increased efficiency & purity  Advantages of Internal Combustion ­ Private users liked range, simplicity; ease of fuelling ­ Electrical industry ignored car market, failed to standardize  ­ Oil industry saw demand for cars, innovated to meet needs ­ Businesses liked range & reliability for growing urban population  ­ Military adoption of gasoline engine gave it early support ;as it was easy to fuel, imperative and  easy to fix ­ Chemical improvements: cheap, plentiful and efficient fuel Kirsch’s Argument ­ Electric car initially more flexible, comparable range for most applications, and of sufficient  speed ­ Gasoline cars were more prone to breakdowns (knock, stalling, general), less reliable, easier to fix ­ Improvements expected for electric, success of industry in the late 1800s the electric economy was booming, every couple of months there was a new  electric tech – ppl thought they would come out with newer tech thus wait out on buying an electric  car until a great version came out ­ While waiting, consumers chose IC cars IC cars then improved, fuel & engine efficiency ­ “waiting” for competitive battery, IC dominated market, standard technology The Rise of the Internal Combustion Automobile ­ By 1914 35,000 electric & 1.5M internal combustion cars.  ­ 1913 ­ 1929, annual car & truck manufacturing increased from 1/2M to 4.5M+, most internal  combustion ­ Federal, state & industrial investment in car infrastructure: roads, fuel, repair facilities, parking lots,  traffic police, courts, insurance ­ 1927, annual car­related deaths 21,000+, injuries higher  ­ Postwar industrialization & rising populations increased demand, oil price shocks in 1970’s,  improvements in production & design, no significant reduction in demand  History and Technological Fixes for Environmental Problems ­ People expect long distance travel, speed, standardized parts for any kind of car they want to buy ­ Industry, commerce, labor and urban development, fast, fuel­efficient vehicles,  All presuppose of  fast fuel efficient cars ­ Hybrid cars, electric cars and performance requirements. For the most part anything an ICE can  do , the other can do as well ­ infrastructure, charging technology, road infrastructure batteries cause individuals to wait for  hours, so innovative tech to get batteries quickly at gas stations or charge in parking lots ­ Effect of attaching millions of electric cars to electricity grid; adding to demand to electricity with all  of our other techs, add cars to that mix … ­ 25% of electrical power in Canada fossil fuel generated; electric cars don’t solve environmental  problem, it only helps ­ electric cars: traffic volume, accidents, urban planning ;these aren’t solved as at compacity of car  limits on the streets NATS 1840 ­ Lecture 14 – The Automobile as a Conservationists’ Tool:  Preserving the Forest for Highway Viewing Conservation and Preservation of Natural Resources ­  Conservation and the modern environmental movement, against interests of  business and industry  ­  Environmentalists and inherent value of nature over value due to uses  ­  anything like tree's has value, even is they are useless to us  they still do have inherent value  ­  19th century conservation efforts directed at saving natural resources to  preserve revenue stream for state  ­  one reason to take of nature is because it is a way of making  money  ­  “Preservationist” movement in early 20th century America, creation of highway  that went through forest, promoting “ tourism” and preservation  ­  ppl who were trying to preserve and conserve the forest, idea  was if you could get ppl to access the forest by paving a highway, then they  could see how beautiful it is  ­  After WWII preservationists viewed roadways and forests as mutually  incompatible  ­  the use of tourism to promote perversion of natural  resources Roads and Redwoods  ­  Co­evolution of highway networks and conservationist movement  ­  at the same time of roads growing so too was the  conservation movment  ­  Train and long distance travel, speed ­a problem with a train is you  cannot really experience nature very well because they travelled so fast  thus you cant appreciate it  ­  Cars at turn of century, 40 mph top speed­ much easier to see and  watch nature  ­  Forest as a “wish image”, utopian vision of the future (a forest accessible by  highway and car) ideal past (a large, unspoiled forest)­ we associate forests with  something very primative and the advanced way of accesing it via  highways and cars which drew ppl in    ­  By WWII cars went faster (100 mph top speed), experience of forest difficult­ before the WWII  ­  1920’s forest not designated protected area, roadside logging discouraged forest  tourism  ­  Preservationist movement shifted focus, “The new activists made saving visible  and accessible forest their top priority; in practice, they protected roadside forest first.”  ­  No concern over vulnerable forest, forest for tourists ­in the end you need  to appeal to ppls interest to get them to save them  ­  Pragmatic view of environmental conservation, accessible areas versus remote  areas  ­  logging continues hidden from view ­this did not stop logging, all it  did was push it to places where you cannot see the logging being done  ­  19th century: harvesting of forest and preserving forest compatible  ­  Forest preservation part of “package”: preserving scenery, improving the  highways and developing tourism ­ppl were starting to buy more cars, highways  were being improved, forest preservation became a part of this package  ­  Nature tourism promoted and profitable since middle of 19th century, automobile  tourism movement, access to nature ­promoting ppl to get in to their cars and see  the country, places to see, better than train because they could so it on  their own time and go off to where trains could not go  ­  Logging companies, vertical integration, moving further inland ­  ­  Local residents and improved roads, travelers used, “... plank wagon roads,  gravel roads, local railroad connections, stage coach routes, and ferry crossings...” and  “...encountered hub­deep dust, axle­deep mud, tire­destroying rocks, hairpin turns, impossible  grades, and flooding rivers.” ­roads were not in the greatest shape, getting any  where took a while and it was not a enjoyable ride  ­  Basic roads allowed loggers access to forests, tourism and advanced r
More Less

Related notes for NATS 1840

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit