Study Guides (248,402)
United States (123,377)
Boston College (3,492)
Economics (366)
ECON 1132 (120)
All (105)
Final

COMPLETE Principles of Economics II/Macroeconomics Notes - Part 2 (got 4.0 on the final)

17 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1132
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Macroeconomics, Test #2 Keely Henesey Chapters 8­10 Chapter 8: The Classical Long­Run Model Macroeconomic Models: Classical Vs. Keynesian −  Classical Model : explains the long­run behavior of the economy o In the long run, the economy operates close to its potential output (when it does  deviates, it does not do so forever) o Believe that powerful forces drive the economy toward full employment −  Keynesian Model : comes into play during the great depression; although the classical model  may explain the economy in the LR, the LR could be a long time in arriving − Why the LR Model is Important… Keynes’ ideas help us to understand economic fluctuations  (movements in output around its long­run trend), but the classical model has proven itself  more useful in explaining the LR trend itself − Assumptions of the LR Model: many of its assumptions are simplifying (involve aggregation),  but one assumption in the classical model goes BEYOND simplification o  Market­Clearing Assumption : all markets clear (all prices will adjust until quantities  supplied and demanded are equal) o Offers Hint of Why It Better Explains the LR… markets will eventually clear How Much Output Will We Produce? − In the labor market, households supply labor and firms demand it − Real Wage—tells us the amount of goods that workers can buy with an hour’s earnings −  Labor Supply Curve : upward slope because as the wage rate increases, more people will want  to work o THUS  ▯A rise in the wage rate increases labor supply −  Labor Demand Curve : downward slope because as the wage rate increases, each firm will find  that, to maximize profits, it should employ fewer workers than before o THUS  ▯A rise in the wage rate decreases the quantity of labor demanded o  Diminishing Returns to Labor : rise in output (and its associated revenues) diminishes  w/ each successive worker; ALSO, each worker adds to firm’s costs  THUS  ▯Firm will continue to hire additional workers so long as they add  more to revenue than to cost − Due to the market clearing assumption, in the classical model, the economy will achieve full  employment on its own in the LR (without government interference) o NO Cyclical Employment − From Employment to Output… How much output will the economy produce at full  employment? This depends on… o (1) Amount of other resources available for labor to use Macroeconomics, Test #2 Keely Henesey Chapters 8­10 o (2) The state of technology (which determines how much output we can produce with  those resources) − Assuming constant technology and a given quantity of all resources other than labor, only the  quantity of labor can affect total output −  Aggregate Production Function : shows how much total output can be produced with different  quantities of labor, when quantities of all other resources and technology are held constant o Upward Slope—an increase in workers will increase total output o Declining Slope—due to the diminishing returns to labor (output rises when another  worker is added, but the rise is smaller with each successive worker) − In the LR view, the economy reaches its potential output automatically (without government  interference) The Role of Spending − Classical view is sure that total spending will cover total output − In a simple economy with only domestic households and firms, in which households spend  all of their income on domestic output,  total spending must be equal to total output  o [Total Output = Total Income] because factor payments (wages, rent, interest, and  profits) go to households o [Total Income = Total Spending] because households spend all of their income o  Say’s Law : “supply creates its own demand”; the idea that total spending will be  sufficient to purchase the total output produced  By producing, firms create a total demand equal to what they have produced  (because an equal amount of income has been created) − Say’s Law is CRITICAL to the Classical View… The labor market is assumed to clear, thus  firms hire at full­employment level (or potential output level); Firms will ONLY continue to  do so if they can sell all of what they are producing o THUS  ▯Full­employment can only be maintained if Say’s Law is true − Total Spending in a More Realistic Economy Has Additional Assumptions… o Households—don’t spend their entire incomes on consumption; some goes toward  taxes and some is saved o Government—collects taxes and purchases goods and services o Business Firms—purchase capital goods (investment spending) P TotalSpending=C+I +G Planned Investment Spending: total business  P spending minus inventory changes I =I−∆ Inventories Net Taxes: government tax revenues minus  transfer payments T=TotalTax Revenue−Transfers Macroeconomics, Test #2 Keely Henesey Chapters 8­10 Disposable Income: after­tax income that is  DisposableIncome=Total Income−NetTaxes either spent or saved Household Saving: after­tax income that  S=Disposable Income−C households do NOT spend on consumption Leakages: income households receive but do not spend ­Savings & Net Taxes­ Injections: spending from sources other than households ­Planned Investment Spending  & Government Purchases­ − Total Spending Equals Total Output IFF Total Leakages equal Total Injections P S+T = I +G ) o In the classical model, this condition will automatically be satisfied Macroeconomics, Test #2 Keely Henesey Chapters 8­10 The Loanable Funds Market −  Loanable Funds Market : market in which savers make their funds available to borrowers o Assumption—the household sector supplies to the loanable funds market; business  firms and the government demand loanable funds Supply of Loanable Funds − [TotalSupplyof Loanable Funds=HouseholdSaving] o Funds are loaned out and households receive interest payments on these funds −  Supply of Funds Curve : indicates the level of household saving at various interest rates o Upward Sloping  ▯Interest is the reward for saving and supplying funds to the loanable   funds market (rise in interest rate sees an increase in supplied funds) Demand for Loanable Funds − [Businesses Total Demandfor LoanableFunds=I ] P o Funds are borrowed and firms pay interest on these funds ' − [Government sDemandfor Loanable Funds=ItsBudgetDeficit=G−T] o Funds are borrowed and the government pays interest on its loans o  Budget Deficit : the excess of government purchases over net taxes  [G>T ] o  Budget Surplus : the excess of net taxes over government p[G
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1132

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit