Study Guides (248,125)
United States (123,280)
Boston College (3,492)
Economics (366)
ECON 2233 (23)
Greene (3)
Midterm

EC233 Midterm 3.docx

6 Pages
75 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 2233
Professor
Greene
Semester
Spring

Description
History of Economic Thought Mill – Keynes   MillText: Book IV, Chapter VI: Of the Stationary State • Heading to stagnation ­ limited growth in population, capital, and wealth • Population restriction possible, hoped man will eventually shun wealth • Socialist views: o Better if everyone has equal opportunities o No inheritance, everyone starts equal o Human improvement would continue, however Book V, Chapter XI: Of the Grounds and Limits of the Laisser­faire • Interventionist: right and duty of government to intervene, wherever useful • Laisser­faire: restricted government to protection of person and property • 2 uses of government: o Authoritarian – what you can and can’t do o Advisory – agencies, public entities (public corps, hospitals) • Individual has a sphere of life which government can’t touch • Objections to government: o Compulsory taxes o More functions of government increases power, ability to violate  freedoms o More functions over task government causing inefficiencies – need  greater efficiency through local and central branches o Individuals are better judges of own life, interests also if they do things  on their own it promotes activity and intelligence • Government roles: o Poor Laws – individuals not best at deciding for others   Government able: spread right amount, help w/o reliance   Private charity: can distinguish who’s deserving o Uneducated, infants, lunatics, etc. need government assistance/protection o Break contracts of perpetuity  • Other government roles: o Scientific endeavors, lighthouses, etc. o Weight whether individuals will undertake task or if government needs to  in order to help all citizens: roads, canals, railways Marx I: A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy • Change in environment would change human nature   • Turns upside down Hegelian philosophy – matter not ideas are the motive force  of history (dialectical materialism) • Capital goods, tools, etc move society forward  Marx II:  Section 3: Progressive Production of a Relative Surplus­Population or Industrial Reserve  Army • Surplus laboring population o Allows accumulation of wealth (capital) o In turn, only potion of capital (variable) creates jobs:   Variable capital ­> quantity of labor (more workers or output) o Capital growth and size of reserve army cyclical and reciprocal o Technology doesn’t develop smoothly, disproportionate market growth,  falling profit (capital accumulation Q) ­> unstable capitalism and  transition to next stage in human history • Wages o Depend on supply of reserve army and actual work force and demand of  labor (decided by economic growth) o Relative surplus population acts as pivot in labor market o Machines displace workers increasing capital, supply of workers remains o Workers compete against each other, increase output in order to not be  laid off thus manufacturers higher less Section 4: Different forms of the relative surplus­population. The general law of  capitalistic accumulation • The larger the reserve army the greater is pauperism • Capital accumulation (at the expense of laborers) necessarily begets misery,  mental degradation, ignorance, etc. Part VIII: Primitive accumulation: the secret of primitive accumulation • Division of market o Group one: smart, industrious profited from other, eventually not working o Group two: riotous, only left with own labor to sell o Owners of production work with owners of labor, divorce of producer  from means of production • Feudalism ­> capitalistic exploitation  Chapter 32: Historical tendency of capitalist accumulation • Few capitalistic usurpers seized land (violent, protracted) while seizing land from  few usurpers for expropriation to the masses (easy, natural) MeekEJ2: Physiocracy and Classicism in Britain Similarities between Quesnay and Smith: • Wanted increase in national wealth via capitalist methods • Realized freedom of trade was necessary • Social surplus only source of new capital • Mutual framework – “Classicism” Differences: • Ph – surplus from land­rent • Smith – surplus from profit and rent • Before Smith, profits were part of rent and interest derived from rent Origins of Classicism: • Found surplus from trade more important than production • Trade started to be challenged, profit recognized as income ­> looked to  production as originator of profit • These paths didn’t include Physiocratic views Question of value: • First, value came from sum of value of items used in order to produce it –  physical cost o Didn’t give value to production o Only worked by assuming items sold above value • Capitalism fostered market price and labor theory of value Jevons Theory Value: • Derived from utility not labor • Employ mathematics to determine Pleasure and pain measurements: • Intensity • Duration • Certainty • Propinquity or remoteness • Pleasure/pain have two dimensions: intensity and duration • Graphed: duration (x­axis) and curved line intensity (y­axis) Utility:
More Less

Related notes for ECON 2233

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit