Study Guides (248,553)
United States (123,415)
Boston College (3,492)
Marketing (16)
MKTG 1021 (16)
Salisbury (5)
Midterm

Marketing Midterm Study Guide.docx

7 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Marketing
Course
MKTG 1021
Professor
Salisbury
Semester
Winter

Description
Marketing Midterm Study Guide Chapter 1 Notes: Many people perceive marketing to be just advertising and personal selling, but it involves much more, including efforts by  individuals and organizations to satisfy customer needs and wants, create value, and make exchanges. Preparation of  financial statements is not part of marketing, although concerns about brands definitely are. Marketing decisions focus on the four Ps of the marketing mix: price, product, place, and promotion.  Manufacturing processes are not the responsibility of marketing. Exchange is the basis of marketing, with both parties to the exchange receiving something of value. Marketing decisions focus on the four Ps of the marketing mix, which are the marketing activities controlled by the firm or  organization. In addition to marketing goods, marketers also work with SERVICE, which offer customers intangible benefits, are produced by  people or machines, and cannot be separated from the producer. Goods, services, and ideas can be marketed. Marketing  services is an essential part of marketing. Services marketing are based on the same fundamentals as the  marketing of goods but extend these ideas. Promotional messages are designed to accomplish one or more of the three promotional goals; informing customers,  persuading customers to take action, or reminding customers about a marketer's product or service. Employment Marketing is used to find the best workers. Forward­looking firms recognize the power of marketing and are  establishing marketing approaches to find key approaches to meet their needs. Some firms like Nike and Mars, Inc., the maker of M&Ms, involve customers directly in the design of products and services to create  additional value and strengthen the relationship between the customer and the firm. This practice is known as: value co­ creation! Customizing orders is a powerful way to address the individual needs of customers. Customers seek benefits and will consider trade­offs among them, while also considering costs. In value­based marketing, the  marketer must: meeting as many needs as possible while also keeping costs down. Customer relationship management is a philosophy that leads to a set of strategies, which often include programs and  systems designed to build loyalty among customers. Expanding globally will lead to marketers job to understand their new customers. Since marketers are the "eyes and ears" of  an organization, they are in the best position to help organizations understand customers. Chapter 2 Notes: A sustainable competitive advantage is something a firm can persistently do better than its competitors. Supply chain  efficiency, brand name, customer satisfaction, and patented technology are all potential sources of sustainable  competitive advantages. Customer, locational, product and operational excellence are all ways a firm can create value and can lead to  sustainable competitive advantages Product excellence is one of the overarching strategies, and a firm may use the product itself, branding, and positioning to  create an advantage difficult for a competitor to copy. A strategic marketing plan usually begins with a situation audit. It also identifies strategic opportunities and potential threats.  It includes an evaluation of alternatives, a set of objectives, action plans, and appropriate pro forma financial statements. The first step in the strategic marketing planning process is to identify the business a firm is in and to identify what  is needed to accomplish its goals and objectives. The business mission should guide all areas of the firm in addition  to the marketing area SWOT part of the audit. In a situation analysis a firm will examine the positives and negatives in its internal operations –  strengths and weaknesses. It will also examine the positives and negatives in the external environment – opportunities  and threats. No firm has sufficient resources to create value for all consumers. Marketers engage in target marketing to focus their firm's  efforts for those segments of the marketplace that are most attractive. In the implementation phase of the strategic marketing planning process, marketers execute the marketing mix including  pricing, product, promotion, and place decisions. The idea of value­based pricing requires firms to charge a price that captures the value customers perceive they are receiving,  which can be difficult to determine. In value­based pricing, firms first determine the perceived value of their product from the  customer's point of view and then price the product accordingly. She will use a series of Metrics, which are measuring systems that quantify a trend, dynamic, or characteristic. Metrics are used to  explain why things happen and predict the future. They make it possible to compare efforts across regions, product lines, time and  more. Effective metrics should be determined as part of the planning process, not an afterthought. The four major growth strategies available to marketers include market penetration, market development, diversification,  and product development. In diversification the firm introduces a new product to a new market segment. Product development is when  the firm introduces a new product to a current market segment. SWOT ANALYSIS: • SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. A SWOT analysis  occurs during the second step in the strategic planning process, the situation analysis. By  analyzing what the firm is good at (its strengths), where it could improve (its weaknesses),  where in the marketplace it might excel (its opportunities), and what is happening in the  marketplace that could harm the firm (its threats), managers can assess their firm’s  situation accurately and plan its strategy accordingly. Internal is dealt with the strengths  and weaknesses and external is the opportunities and threats.  Chapter 4 Notes: By paying close attention to customer needs and continuously monitoring the environment in which it operates, marketers  can identify potential opportunities. A firm's macroenvironment includes external factors, which the marketer cannot control The mission is the center of all marketing efforts. Competitors are an aspect of the immediate environment. Examples of macroenvironmental factors are the  economic situation, changes in laws and regulations, demographics, and culture. Culture is the term used for a collection of shared values and beliefs. Compared to other groups, members of the generation x generational cohort are more likely to marry and buy homes later, are  more cynical, are shopping savvy and are relatively less interested in luxury brands. While political candidates may practice elements of marketing, some key trends facing for profit and not­for­profit marketers  alike are green marketing, marketing to children, privacy concerns and the impact of a time­poor society. Stock exchanges have their own rules and regulations, but they do not regulate firms the way governments do. Major factors that must be considered by marketers in examining the economic situation include all of the following such as  inflation rates, foreign currency fluctuations, and interest rates. Income is not because it is more appropriately considered as a  demographic factor. Chapter 5 Notes: Marketing focuses on creating value for customers. The more marketers understand how consumers make decisions, the better  they can adapt their marketing strategies to meet the needs and wants of consumers. The consumer decision process model helps marketers to assess how consumers make purchase decisions. The consumer decision process begins when: customers recognize that they have an unsatisfied need. A consumer will examine his or her own memory and product knowledge first. Next, the consumer will conduct an external  search to fill in personal memory gaps. Basically, internal an
More Less

Related notes for MKTG 1021

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit