Study Guides (248,168)
United States (123,294)
Boston College (3,492)
Philosophy (239)
PHIL 1070 (72)
svetelj (10)
Midterm

Midterm Questions.docx

9 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1070
Professor
svetelj
Semester
Fall

Description
Philosophy of the Person I Fall 2013 Midterm exam – Questions 1. What is Plato’s Republic about? to determine an extended definition of what constitutes Justice in a state and how Justice can be accomplished it also strives to define individual justice an underlining question through out the book is, is it better to be just than to be just? Is a just man truly happy 2. What are the initial definitions of Justice? (Book I) in the beginning dialog there are unable to arrive at a conclusion for what justice is but they come to many for what justice is  not.  Ex: telling the truth and paying ones debts Story of the friend and the sword, would you give it back if they go crazy There is a lot of debate with Thrasymachus about is being unjust better off than being just In the end there is no definition  3. how does Glaucon define all goods? Where does justice belong? (II) he has 3 types of goods 1. Things that we desire only for their consequences physical training/ medical treatment 2. Things that we desire for its own sake joy 3. A combination of 1 and 2 knowledge and health he says that most people class justice with the first category because one does not practice it for their own sake but out of fear and weakness example: ring of Gyges­ if invisible you would act unjust 4.  what is the legend of the ring of Gyges about? It is an example that people only act just because they fear the consequences and punishment of not The story states: imagine a man receives a ring that can turn him invisible, if in possession of the ring a man can act unjustly  with no fear of reprisal, and that you can deny that even the most just man would not be tempted to be unjust without can  consequences 5. talking about justice in the individual, Socrates introduces the political justice as well. Why? He believes that since a city is bigger than a man, he will proceed upon the assumption that it is easier to first look for justice  at the political level and then later to see if there is a similar virtue among individuals.  6.  What is for Socrates the foundational principle of human society? What does it mean? THE PRINCIPLE OF SPECIALIZATION Each person is to perform the role for which they are best naturally suited and must no meddle with any other business A farmer must only be a farmer, not also a carpenter This is brought out by the principle that human beings have a natural inclination of fulfillment 7. How does Socrates build the perfect city? Describe its groups (IV) the guardians­ who have the wisdom, because they are the rulers the auxiliaries­ have the courage, because they are the ones that fight for the city the producers moderation and justice are spread over the 3 groups 8. Nature does not produce warriors; they have to be educated. Who are the men disposed to become warriors and what  their education looks like? What is Socrates’ dilemma regarding their education? (Book II). What is the function of stories /  myths in the process of education? (Book III) it is crucial that these guardians/ warriors develop a good balance between gentleness and toughness they must be carefully selected with correct nature or innate psychology education will involve physical training for body, music and poetry for the soul it is so important because it effects the soul and ultimately the city as a whole the stories are meant to be teachings for the guardians so no bad stories are allowed 9. Explain the myth of the metals? (III) it says that all citizens are born out of the earth, this persuades the people to be patriotic, and it says that the ground is  everyone’s mother and that all the citizens are then brothers and sisters. It then states that in each of our souls is a small  piece of the earth and that some have gold=guardians some silver=auxiliary and some bronze=producers.  The idea of the myth is that Plato does not want any conflict between who is in what class and that everyone knows where  they belong  Also gives idea that children can be born into different groups 10. Why does not Socrates care about the happiness of the warriors? What is more important? (IV) he does not care about the happiness of any single group because what means the most is that the city as a whole is happy 11. Why does the just city need no law? 12. Where is the place of Justice in the just city? Where is the place of wisdom, courage, and moderation? WISDOM is with the guardians because they are the rulers  COURAGE is with the auxiliaries because they are fighting the battles MODERATION AND JUSTICE are spread though out the entire city to all of the classes Justice is that everyone does their own job  Moderation is that everyone has self control 13. Describe tree parts of the human soul and their functions! What is the soul of the just person like? 14. Who are the true philosophers who should rule the city? Describe the difference between true and false philosophers.  (V,VI). True philosophers will take care of all while others will just take care of some The difference between the real and pseudo are the fake re the “lovers of sights and sounds” While the real are those who have the knowledge of the forms, the external truth  The lovers of sights and sounds have opinions and not knowledge 15. Socrates compares the situation in the city to a ship with an old captain. What is the message of this parable? The message is that the good true philosophers who were not corrupted are not being used That everyone is trying to be clever and use unjust tricks to get ahead but those who have true knowledge are not being use The story That a ships captain has fallen ill and that all of the other men on the boat who are not qualified are trying to take over his  position by using clever tricks but in reality that is not helpful to the boat because they do not have the navigational skills  16. The true philosopher is able to come to know the Good itself. Socrates describes the Good as “what is apparently  an offspring of the good and most like it” (506e). Explain the analogy of the Sun and its relation to the Good! (VI) the sun is the visible realm  it is the source of light, which makes us intelligent it gives us sight, and it enables us to see­> which makes us capable of knowledge  and it is responsible for causing things to exist (esp. the Forms) 17. The analogy is meant to illustrate four grades of understanding the world. Explain these four grades. It is the analogy of the line­ first you take a line and split it half At the bottom= IMAGINATION It is the lowest because it only exists in our minds Next = BELIEFS  Low because it is also consistently changing Right above half way= THOUGHTS Like geometry (we have different forms/shapes that are always forms, but we need them) At the top= UNDERSTANDING Simply knowing, pure abstract knowledge “the good” 18. Explain the allegory of the Cave. (VII) there are people who are in a cave and are chained there and positioned so that they can only face the opposite way of the  entrance. Behind them is at wall with statues on it and a fire is behind the wall, so that the light from the fire casts shadows  on the wall in front of the people. THEY THINK THIS IS WHAT IS REAL IN THE WORLD BUT REALLY JUST  IMAGINATION finally they are released from the chains and turn around to see that the shadows are not real but just figures of real things  THIS IS BELIEF some will finally make their way out of the cave and at the very beginning they will see nothing because they are adjusting to  the sun but then they start seeing real objects (trees, grass, animals) THIS IS THOUGHT lastly they see the sun and learn that they are only able to see these real objects because of the sun THIS IS  UNDERSTANDING the sun=the good and once they become philosophers with the knowledge they must retur
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1070

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit