Session 11 Notes.docx

4 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUSC 1116
Professor
Brian Robison
Semester
Spring

Description
Session 11: Leonore & Fidelio • Complex history of the ONLY opera for which Beethoven composed music, Leonore  (now known as Fidelio, op. 72) • Fidelio’s strengths and weaknesses as an opera  Opera was hard for Beethoven especially since when he began to think about stage  projects, his deafness was settled and it was difficult for him to deal with operatic  people  There was a general hope in Viennese musical circles that he would turn to opera  He never managed to complete another opera besides Leonore/Fidelio despite many  abortive ideas over many years  Beethoven’s attachment to the heroic and the ideal made him reject more  contemporary opera as light and frivolous. He admired Cherubini “of all living opera  composers the one more worth attending to”  Had a desire to integrate into opera something of the serious dramatic urgency that he  had mastered in instrumental music  ▯ Rescue Opera  Beethoven's prior grounding in operatic style: o Collaborated with Emanuel Schikaneder (the librettist for Mozart's The Magic  Flute) to write Vesta's Fire, but dropped the project after writing the first scene o Chose current operatic hits as themes for sets of piano variations o Wrote concert arias, and wrote two arias for a singspiel (Umlauf's Die schöne  Schusterin = The pretty cobblerette) • rescue opera o Very popular since Mosart’s Entfurung in 1782 o Served as adventure stories of heroes in exotic realms and as fictional  evocations of the prisons and guillotines of the French Revolution and the  Terror o The evocation of harsh political realities in operas incited the illusion of truth  while their happy endings assuaged the fears of contemporary audiences • Leonore, ou L’Amour conjugale o The text of the opera was written in the late 1790s by Jean Nicolas Bouilly o About a woman disguised as a young man had worked her way into her  husband’s prison and freed him from his unjust captivity o Commemorated not only actual heroism but the author’s own benevolence  amid the frightening atmosphere of France in those years • Jean Nicolas Bouilly o A literary man who wrote Leonore, ou L’Amour conjugale o Was administrator of a French department nears Tours during the Reign of  Terror • Pierre Gaveaux o French composer who premiered the first setting of Bouilly’s libretto in 1798 o It was then translated in Italian by Ferdinando Paer • Joseph Sonnleithner o Translated the libretto of Leonore for Beethoven in 1805 o Secretary of the Court Theater and a prominent Viennese lawyer and musician o His libretto is well­made compared to the French and Italian versions o Met the demands of melodrama with scenes of power and pathos for the  principals • Beethoven’s Leonore failed on its first performances in November 1805 because  Vienna was taken over by Napoleon’s armies o Beethoven then produced a revised version in March and April of 1806 (much  more successful), with the newly rewritten Leonore Overture No. 3 in place of  the one known as No. 2 o Final version was  • G. F. Treitschke o Reworked the libretto  o An experienced hand in theater • Beethoven’s Fidelio, op. 72 o Beethoven rewrote many portions of the score which cost him more hard labor  than if he were composing a new work. But he 
More Less

Related notes for MUSC 1116

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit