Get 2 days of premium access
Study Guides (370,000)
US (220,000)
UC-Irvine (3,000)
CRM/LAW (100)
Study Guide

CRM/LAW C7 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Guide: Tesla Model X, Subculture, Panopticon


Department
Criminology, Law and Society
Course Code
CRM/LAW C7
Professor
Peter Hanink
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 26 pages of the document.
UC-Irvine
CRM/LAW C7
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Where does our criminal justice system come from?
How does human behavior relate to crime control?
What is criminal justice?
1.
What purpose does our criminal justice system serve?
2.
What does it mean for a state to be just?
3.
Guiding Questions
When we punish
Who we punish
In essence, it's about punishment
-
What is Criminal Justice?
Beccaria & Bentham
Writings of Rousseau, Hobbes, and Locke
Emerges out of the enlightenment and the social contract
The Classical School
-
Humans freely and willingly give up part of their liberty to the state
People know what they are doing, and if they break a law, they should be punished
Punishment is necessary and justified when laws are broken and the public is endangered
Equality before the law is the fundamental principle
Beccaria
-
Rule of Law - legislators make laws and set punishment. Judges' only job is to determine
guilt or innocence.
Human beings are rational and free.
Punishment should fit the crime, not the criminal.
Severity
Certainty
Swiftness
3 parts
If I want to prevent crime, then I should fiddle with those 3 settings to find the
right "recipe" to deter crime.
Deterrence
Retribution
We shouldn't be punishing people just to punish them.
Punishment should only be so severe so that pain is greater than pleasure.
Punishment goals
Certainty and swiftness of punishment are more crucial to the prevention of crime than is
severity
Protect the rights of the accused - the accused should be presumed innocent and court
hearings should be clear and fair.
Central assumptions of Classical School
-
Observation --> question --> hypothesis --> experiment
We don't really know why people commit crime, so let's find out.
Focused on the scientific method
The Positivist School
-
First Reading
Week 1: Lecture 1 - Human Behavior & Crime Control
Wednesday, August 3, 2016
1:24 PM
Crim C7 Page 1
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

We don't really know why people commit crime, so let's find out.
Crime was a function of the body, it's essentially physical
Tried to figure out what kinds of people were more likely to commit a crime
Cesare Lombroso - The Criminal Man (1876)
We aren't responsible for our bodies
Crime is determined by factors largely outside control of individual
Crime isn't caused by just one thing
Multiple-factor causation
People don't commit a crime because they sit there and weigh the costs and
benefits
Rejected rational choice explanations of crime
The individual in trying to understand why that person committed that crime
Focus on the criminal not the crime
Assumptions
free will vs determinism
Classical vs Positivist - Human Behavior
-
Classical School
Positivist School
Rational choice theory
Social structure theories
Social process theories
Critical criminology
Trait theories
Other theories of crime causation
Causes of Crime
-
If we do this, then maybe we will stop more crime from occurring in the future.
Our criminal justice policies and practices are based on and influenced by our theories of criminal
behavior
-
POINT
Crim C7 Page 2
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version