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[SOC SCI H1F] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (125 pages long)


Department
Social Science
Course Code
SOC SCI H1F
Professor
William R Schonfeld
Study Guide
Final

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UC-Irvine
SOC SCI H1F
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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LECTURE 1
January 10, 2017
About the Course
Combine political theory with psychology (psychoanalysis, a creation of Sigmund Freud)
o Political theory is designed government (Locke and Rousseau) before we had a
fuller knowledge of human nature
o It is not easy for human beings to fit within society
Cultural relativism and postmodernism
o These topics address how we conduct ourselves in society
o One threat to society is violence, so e’ll talk a lot aout hua iolee ad
what we might do to ameliorate it
unique: what matters is our particularity
What is that balance between individualism and collectivity?
Abstract views that exist in our world today:
o Individualism = the concrete human individual is irrefutable, the basic element
of a society. What is good for society is good for most people.
o Corporatism = rejects individuals, but rather says that the individual is a finite
being who in contrast belongs to a permanent social institution, the corporal
communal without which the person is nothing that from which culture, ideas,
etc. come from.
People dyig does’t eally hage the hole ay oe tha gettig id
of cells changed me. What matters is the whole, not the cells that
compose it.
A film that mocks faith: freedom of expression or an offense to a whole nation?
Freedom
For the individual, freedom is doing what you want to do with the least amount of
external constraints.
o Freedom is conceived of as something that, on the one hand, is absolute, and is
only constrained by the codes of civil society.
o The constraints of society prohibit me from doing all sorts of things. A reduction
of freedom for us. Where we draw those lines, people can argue about.
I do’t hae the feedo to go ph o the feeay
We’e all dessed– is this an act of personal shame, o a esult of soiety’s
constraints?
o The idea of freedom is doing whatever I want.
“ayig hat you eliee, daig offesie pitues of Chist…
Freedom is freedom from constraint.
In the corporatist old, feedo is self-actualization, the feedo to achieve the
ost that you’e apale of ahieig. It has othig to do ith pushig the liits of
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ideas or of speech, but rather says that your freedom is to make a major contribution
to society, and society has to provide the structures which enable you to do that.
o Derivative of the images of what matters most: in a corporatist setting, we
ealize the eed fo etai esposiilities suh as dotos. It’s ot a uestio
of hat you’d like to e, ut hee’s a ay y hih you a help ad that’s
you feedo to see as a doto, o hatee else you’e seig as.
Group Membership
In individualist society, the idea is to maximize our potential as individuals. It is good to
belong to as many distinct groups as possible.
o Join groups, join clubs, as ways of realizing yourself. We have groups for all sorts
of things, over 300 of them at UCI. Interest groups, ethnic groups, political
goups, et. That’s good i a idiidualist soiety– the more groups, the
merrier.
In corporatist soiety, you’e a ee of the corporation and there are no other
groups that should matter. It is that single corporate membership by which you are
defined.
o Many are religiously purist, following one dominant faith. You belong to it,
period.
Sanctions
In an individualistic society, the worst sanction is death.
In corporatist society, there are sanctions such as exclusion, kicking you out of the
group which is defining, removing from you everything that gives you meaning.
o (e.g.) Roman Catholic Church has a process of excommunication, an exclusion
o (e.g.) In the Soviet Union, someone who received the Nobel Prize chose not to go
because if he accepted it, he would be excluded from the community.
How do you decide what’s good?
Individualistic: try to figure out what the majority wants, what do most individuals want
Corporatist: try to figure out what is the consensus (what everyone, the collectivity,
wants) a single position.
How do you make decisions?
Follows from deciding hat’s good
In an individualistic soiety, it’s a majority vote
o (e.g.) U.S. presidential election: two different traditions that develop a tension in
a democratic society between majority votes (separate states being
appropriately counted) and electoral college
o Every real world society involves an amalgam of these mixes of instances
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