Textbook Notes (368,775)
Canada (162,159)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block B - Integrated Control of the Nervous System.docx

4 Pages
156 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Summer

Description
Module VIII – Unit II Integrated Control INTRODUCTION: In the previous unit we focused on involuntary spinal reflexes. In this unit we switch our attention to the  more complex problem of how thoughts get translated into action. 3 CLASSIFICATIONS OF MOVEMENT: Movement can be loosely separated into 3 types ­ reflex, voluntary, and rhythmic. These types are  summarized in Table 13­2. REFLEX VOLUNTARY RHYTHMIC Stimulus Initiating  Primarily external via  External stimuli or at will Initiation & termination  Movement sensory receptors voluntary Minimally voluntary Example Knee jerk, cough, postural  Playing piano Walking, running reflexes Complexity Least complex Most complex Intermediate complexity Integrated at level of SC orIntegrated in cerebral cortex Integrated in SC with  brain stem with higher  higher center input  center modulation required Comments Inherent, rapid Learned movements that  Spinal circuits act as  improve with practice pattern generators Once learned, may become  Activation of these  subconscious (muscle  pathways requires input  memory) from brain stem Postural Reflexes: • Help us maintain upright posture, balance and body position • Integrated in the brain stem – Require continuous sensory input from o Visual & vestibular sensory systems (help maintain position in space) o Muscle, tendon & joint receptors provide info about proprioception  Position of various body parts relative to one another Central Pattern Generators: • Networks of CNS neurons that function spontaneously to control certain rhythmic muscle movements • Rhythmic movements are initiated & terminated by input from the cerebral cortex o However, once activated CPGs maintain the spontaneous repetitive activity • Spinal cord injuries o Paralysis stops walking because damage to descending pathway blocks the start walking signal  from brain to spinal cord o However, if CPG activated and reinforced by sensory signals from muscle spindles it can drive  contraction of the leg muscles 3 LEVELS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM CONTROL MOVEMENT: 1 Module VIII – Unit II Integrated Control Neural control of movement at different locations in the central nervous system is outlined in Table 13­3. Figure 13­11 illustrates how the different levels of the motor control hierarchy communicate with each other  to plan, initiate and execute movement. Figure 13­12 shows the representation of the body on the motor cortex. You may want to compare this figure  to Figure 10­10 on page 344. Notice how the representation of different body parts differs in size in the two  drawings. Why is this the case? 1. The spinal cord a. Integrates spinal reflexes & contains central pattern generators (CPGs) 2. The brain stem & cerebellum a. Control postural reflexes, as well as hand & eye movements 3. The cerebral cortex & basal ganglia a. Responsible for voluntary movements The thalamus relays & modifies signals being sent from the spinal cord, basal ganglia & cerebellum to the  cerebral cortex Location Role Receives Input From Sends Integrative Output To Spinal Cord Spinal reflexes Sensory receptors Brains stem, cerebellum,  thalamus/cerebral cortex Locomotor pattern generators Brain Stem Posture Cerebellum, visual & 
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit