Textbook Notes (367,933)
Canada (161,513)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block A - Compartmentation - Cells and Tissues.docx

5 Pages
134 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Summer

Description
Module I Compartmentation: Cells & Tissues INTRODUCTION: As stated in the overview of Block A, the human body is a collection of a vast number of cells, the basic  functional unit of life. In Unit 1 of this Module we saw that they are multiple systems in the body that carry out  different functions. Here we will discover that each individual cell performs many of the same functions. They  can monitor and respond to changes in their environment. Cells communicate with neighboring cells by  releasing chemicals or by generating electrical signals. Cells take in oxygen and nutrients, extract energy from  the nutrients for growth, repair, and reproduction, and get rid of wastes such as carbon dioxide. The cells of the body come in all sizes and shapes, from large nerve cells with multiple long thin  extensions, to the very small disc­shaped red blood cells. In accordance with their specialized functions, cells  also have variable numbers and types of channels, receptors, intracellular organelles, muscle filaments, secretory  granules, etc. On the other hand, cells have a number of features in common, and these features are examined in  this unit. They include the plasma membrane that surrounds the cell, and the fluid and intracellular organelles  that are enclosed by the membrane. Just as atoms bond together to form molecules, cells join together to form tissues. The basic types of  tissues will be examined. The body is divided into fluid compartments. • The intracellular fluid (ICF) is found inside of cells • The extracellular fluid (ECF) ­­ which also forms the internal environment of the body ­­ is further  separated into the interstitial fluid (ISF) and blood plasma  For any substance to move between the ICF and ECF compartments, it must pass through a cell membrane. • The plasma membrane separates the inside of the cell (cytoplasm) from the ECF (internal environment)  outside the cell • It controls what molecules move between the two compartments.  The Fluid­Mosaic Model (FMM): • All biological membranes consist of a combo of lipids & proteins plus some carbohydrate o Phospholipid bilayer  Hydrophilic phosphate heads face aqueous solutions inside & outside of the cell  Hydrophobic lipid tails hidden in the center of the cell membrane o  Membrane studded with protein molecules o Extracellular surface has glycoproteins & glycolipids 4 Functions of Cell Membranes: 1. Physical Isolation • Physical barrier separating ICF from surrounding ECF 2. Regulation • Regulation of exchange with the environment • Controls: 1 Module I Compartmentation: Cells & Tissues o Entry of ions/nutrients into the cell o Elimination of cell wastes o Release of products from the cell 3. Communication • Communication between the cell & its environment • Contains proteins enabling the cell to:  o Recognize/respond to molecules or changes in its external  environment • ANY alteration in the cell membrane may affect the cell’s activities 4. Structural Support • Proteins in membrane hold the cytoskeleton to maintain cell shape • Create junctions between cells & EC matrix o Cell­cell junctions stabilize the structure of tissues Basic Structures of the Cell: These organelles allow Compartmentation inside the cell Organelle Characteristics Function Microvilli Extensive folding of the cell membrane Increase SA for absorption Cell Membrane Bilayer of PL molecules with inserted proteins Acts as a gateway for & barrier to  movement of material between the  interior of the cell & the ECF Cytosol Semi­gelatinous substance Contains dissolved nutrients, ions,  wastes, insoluble inclusions Suspends the organelles Lysosomes/ Membrane­bound vesicles filled  Digest bacteria & old organelles Peroxisomes with enzymes Metabolize FA Golgi Complex Hollow membranous sacs Modify & package proteins Mitochondrion Double wall with central matrix Produces most of cell’s ATP Centrioles Bundles of microtubules Direct movement of DNA during cell  division Nucleus Central lumen with a 2­membrane outer  Contains DNA to direct all functions of  envelope with pores the cell Nucleolus Region of DNA, RNA & protein Contains the genes that direct synthesis  2 Module I Compartmentation: Cells & Tissues of rRNA RER (Granular) Membrane tubules that are continuous with the  Site of protein synthesis outer nuclear membrane (edged with  ribosomes) SER  (Agranular) Same as ER, but without ribosomes Synthesis of FA, steroids & lipids Ribosomes Granules of RNA & protein Assemble AA into proteins Microtubules/ Protein fibers Provide strength & support Microfilaments Enable cell motility Transport 3 Types of Specialized Cell­Cell Junctions: 1. Gap Junctions • Simplest cell­cell junctions • Create communication bridges between cells for rapid chem/electrical signaling between cells • Connexins (cylindrical proteins) create channels o Channels open/close to regulate movement of m
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit