Textbook Notes (368,330)
Canada (161,803)
Chapter 8

2D03_Chapter 8.docx

6 Pages
168 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Life Sciences
Course
LIFESCI 2D03
Professor
Rashid Khan
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 8: Antipredator Behaviour 8.1 Animals Modify Their Behaviour To Reduce Predation Risk  1. Cryptic Coloration: morphological colouration that matches the colour of the  environment to reduce detection by predators.  PREY TAKE EVASIVE ACTION WHEN DETECTED 2. When a predator initiates an attack, prey often flee in an effort to escape. This  predator­prey interaction can be very dramatic, as when a Canadian lynx chases  a showshoe hare, or when a hawk chases a squirrel.  3. Other species cannot flee because they move slower than heir predators, and in  these cases, we see different kinds of antipredator behaviour.  1. For example, in the dark of an Arizona night, a fascinating behavioural  interaction occurs between big brown bat preators and their prey, tiger moths,  which fly much more slowly.  1. Bats hunt by sound. They emit sonic pulses and find flying insects such as  moths by hearing the sonic pulses that bounce of of their prey.  2. This sonar system is a highly effective way for bats to pinpoint the  location and size of potential prey in the dark night sky.  3. Moths’ ears can also detect the sonic pulses, so they know when bats are  hunting nearby. They then fly in a more erratic pattern in an attempt to  evade the fast­moving bat.  8.2 Many Behaviour Represent Adaptive Trade­Offs Involving  Predation Risk 4. A world without predators would allow animals to concentrate their behaviour on  activities that maximize their fitness, perhaps by increasing time searching for  mates. In that light, the existence of predators represents a cost to animals: they  modify their behaviour to reduce the probability that they will be killed.  5. Behavioural Trade Off: sacrificing one activity for another. INCREASED VIGILANCE DECREASES FEEDING TIME 6. Vigilance Behaviour: a behaviour in which an animal scans the environment for  predators.  7. This head­down position usually results in a reduced visual scanning rage.  Vegetation, such as grasses or other plants, can also increase the obstruction of  an animal’s scanning range.  VIGLIANCE AND PREDATION RISK IN ELK 8. Another strategy is to move to a safe location before eating food. Lima and  colleagues hypothesized that food carrying might represent a trade­off between  feeding in safety (in a tree) and obtaining high­energy intake rates. 9. Energy Intake Rate: the energy acquired while feeding divided by total feeding  time.  1. The model assumes that a squirrel’s fitness increases as energy intake rate  increases and the probability of being killed decreases.  2. It also assumes that a squirrel is at risk od being killed while one the ground  but safe while in a tree.  10. Handling time: the amount of time to manipulate a food item so that it is ready  to eat.  ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS AND PREDATION RISK IN FORAGING  REDSHANKS PREDATION RISK AND PATCH QUALITY IN ANTS 11. Nonacs has studied predation risk­foraging trade­offs in Lasius, a common ant in  western North America. Much as in the study on redshanks, Nonacs asked  whether ants will trade off higher predation risk for feeding in a richer food  patch.  12. In order to demonstrate that Lasius ants respond to the threat of predation by  Formica ants, Nonacs set up a simple experiment with Larry Dill. 13. The researchers offered a Lasius colony two­food patches that contained identical  food. This food was solution of sugar, proteins, vitamins, and nutrients and was a  preferred ant food. The two food patches were identical distances away from a  colony, but Lasius workers had to ravel through a small arena that contained a  Formica predator in order to obtain food from one of the patches.  1. In the control patch, Lasius ants did not need to encounter a Formica  predator to obtain food. Thus, the patches contained identical food, but the  control patch was safe (no predators), while the other, the experimental  treatment, was risk.  2. They found that after some Lasius workers had been killed, the rest would  avoid the risky patch and obtain food only from the safe patch. From this  experiment they concluded that Lasius ants prefer to avoid predators.  14. Once they had demonstrated that Lasius ants prefer to avoid Formica predators,  Nonacs and Dill designed another experiment. They wished to see if these ants  would exhibit a behavioural trade­off between predation risk and food rewards. 1. To examine this question, they offered the Lasius ants two food patches that  differed in both predation risk and food quality. One food patch was both  risky (predator present) and rich with food, and the other was safe (no  predator present) but poor in food quality.  1. Both food patches again contained a solution of sugar, protein, vitamins,  and nutrients and were placed equidistant in their concentration of food:  the rich food patch had a higher concentration of food than the poor food  patch.  2. In this experiment, the Lasius ants always ha to travel through an arena that  contained a Formica predator if they wanted to feed from the rich patch.  Thus, to feed from the richer patch, workers were subject to higher rates of  predations, making it the riskier food patch.  3. Nonacs and Dill varied the relative difference in quality between the two food  patches. Because the food patches offered a food solution, the researchers  could manipulate the quality of a food patch by altering the concentration of  the food.  1. The safe food patch always had the lowest concentration of food, while 
More Less

Related notes for LIFESCI 2D03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit