Textbook Notes (368,418)
Canada (161,876)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 2NF3 (59)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1

6 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2NF3
Professor
Ayesha Khan
Semester
Winter

Description
Psych 2NF3: Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Chapter 1: The Development of Neuropsychology Introduction ­ Neuropsychology is strongly influenced by two traditional foci of experimental  and theoretical investigations into brain function: • Brain hypothesis: the idea that the brain is the source of behaviour • Neuron hypothesis: the idea that the unit of brain structure and function is  the neuron The Brain Hypothesis ­ Brain is an Old English word for the tissue found within the skull ­ The brain has two symmetrical halves called hemispheres ­ The basic plan of the brain is that of a tube filled with salty fluid called  cerebrospinal fluid that cushions the brain and may play a role in removing  metabolic waste ­ Outer layers is the cerebral cortex ­ Folds of the cortex are called gyri, and the creases between them are called sulci ­ Some large sulci are called fissures, such as the longitudinal fissure that divides  the two hemispheres and the lateral fissure that divides each hemisphere into  halves ­ Temporal lobe, frontal love, parietal lobe, occipital lobe ­ Brain’s hemispheres are connected by pathways called commissures, the largest of  which is the corpus callosum ­ The cerebral cortex constitutes most of the forebrain ­ Brain stem is connected to the spinal cord, which descends down the back in the  vertebral column ­ This three­part division of the brain is useful: • Evolutionarily: animals with only spinal cords preceded those with  brainstems, which preceded those with forebrains • Anatomically: in prenatal development, the spinal cord forms before the  brainstem, which forms before the forebrain • Functionally: the forebrain mediates cognitive function, the brainstem  mediates regulatory functions, and the spinal cord is responsible for  sending commands to the muscles ­ Neuropsychologists commonly refer to functions performed in the forebrain as  higher functions because they include thinking, perception, and planning ­ The central nervous system, consisting of the brain and spinal cord, are enclosed  within a protective covering and is connected to the rest of the body through nerve  fibers ­ Peripheral nervous system consists of nerve fibers that carry information away  from the CNS, and others bring information to it ­ PNS tissue will regrow after damage ­ Sensory pathways: collections of fibers carry messages for specific sensory  sustems ­ Sensory pathways carry information collected on one side of the body mainly to  the cortex in the opposite hemisphere by means of a subdivision of the PNS called  the somatic nervous system ­ Motor pathways are the groups of nerve fibers that connect the brain and spinal  cord to the body’s muscles through the SNS ­ Pathways that control organs are a subdivision of the PNS called the autonomic  nervous system ­ Alcmaeon located mental processes in the brain and subscribed to the brain  hypothesis ­ Empedocles located them in the heart and so subscribed to the cardiac hypothesis ­ Aristotle was the first person to develop a formal theory of behaviour, proposing  that a nonmaterial psyche was responsible for human thoughts, perceptions, and  emotions ­ The philosophical position that a person’s mind is responsible for behaviour is  called mentalism ­ Descartes: described as nonmaterial and without spatial extent, the mind was  different from the body. • The body operated on principles similar to those of a machine, but the  mind decided what movements the machine would make. • The mind working through the pineal body, controlled valves that allowed  CSF to flow form the ventricles through nerves to muscles, filling them  and making them move • Today the pineal body is known as the pineal gland, and is thought to take  part in controlling biorhythms ­ Dualism: position that mind and body are separate but can interact ­ Mind­body problem: a person is capable of being conscious and rational only  because of having a mind, but how can a nonmaterial mind produce movements in  a material body? ­ Monists avoid the mind­body problem by postulating that the mind and body are  simply a unitary whole ­ Materialism: the idea that rational behaviour can be fully explained by the  working of the nervous system without any need to refer to a nonmaterial mind ­ The nervous system is an adaptation that emerged only once in animal evolution Experimental Approaches to Brain Function ­ Quantitative methods allow researchers to check one another’s conclusions ­ Localization of function: • Gall and Spurzheim proposed that the cortex and its gyri were functioning  parts of the brain and not just covering the pineal body • Brain produces behaviour through the control of other parts of the brain  and spinal cord through the corticospinal tract • Hemispheres are connected by the corpus callosum and can interact • A bump on the skull indicated a well­developed underlying cortical gyrus  and therefore a greater capacity for a particular behaviour • Phrenology: study of the relation between the skull’s surface and a  person’s faculties • Cranioscopy: device that was placed around to skull to measure the bumps  and depressions ­ Localization and lateralization of language: • Bouillaud argued from clinical studies that certain functions are localized  in the cortex, and specifically, that speech is localized in the frontal lobes,  in accordance with Gall’s theory • Broca located speech in the third convolution of the frontal lobe on the left  side of the brain • Broca discovered that language was localized and that functions could be  localized to a side of the brain, a property known as lateralization Sequential Programming and Disconnection ­ People who interpreted Broca’s findings as evidence that language resides in one  part of the brain are called strict localizationists ­ Wernicke described the relation between the functioning of hearing and that of  speech 1. Damage was evident in the first temporal gyrus 2. No opposite­side paralysis was observed 3. Patients could speak fluently, but what they said was confused and made little  sense 4. Although the patients were able to hear, they could neither understand nor  repeat what was said to them ­ The region of the temporal lobe associated with this form of aphasia is the  Wernicke’s area ­ Wernicke also provided the first model for how language is organized in the left  hemisphere and thus the first modern model of brain function ­ From Wenicke’s area, auditory ideas can be sent through a pathway called the  arcuate faasciulus which leads to Broca’s area. From Broca’s area, neural  instructions are sent to muscles th
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2NF3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit