Textbook Notes (368,117)
Canada (161,660)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 3BA3 (49)
Chapter 7

Chapter 7.docx

3 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3BA3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 7: Making the Most of Emotional Experiences: Emotion­Focused Coping,  Emotional Intelligence, Socioemotional Selectivity, and Emotional Storytelling • Emotional approach involves active movement toward, rather than away from, a  stressful encounter • The behavioural activation system regulates our appetite motivation, which  helps us realize emotional or behavioural rewards, whereas the behavioural  inhibition system functions to help us avoid negative events and punishments • Over a 3 month period, women who used emotion­focused coping perceived their  health status as better, had lower psychological distress, and had fewer medical  appointments for cancer­related pain and ailments, compared to those who did not • Emotional preferences related to coping may interact with environmental  contingencies to determine psychological outcomes • When individuals of racial and ethnic minority groups feel that they have ways of  coping emotionally with experiences of discrimination, greater self­esteem and  greater life satisfaction were more closely linked with a stronger identification  with their racial group • Use of emotion­focused styles of coping to deal with stressors related to personal  racism, or as part of a racial group, may increase well­being and/or decrease stress  for individuals experiencing these types of stressors in their environments • Emotional processing seems to become more adaptive as people learn more about  what they feel and why they feel it  • Over time, we may develop the tendency to face our stressors directly and  repeatedly and thereby habituate to certain predictable negative experiences • Emotion is “a high order of intelligence”, and adapting to life circumstances  requires cognitive abilities and emotional skills that guide our behaviour • The Salovey and Mayer four­branch ability model of emotional intelligence has  been predicated on the belief that skills needed to reason about emotions and to  use emotional material to assist reasoning can be learned • Branch 1 of the model involves skills needed to perceive and express feelings;  more specifically, perceptions of emotions requires picking up on subtle  emotional cues that might be expressed in a person’s face or voice • Branch 2 concerns using emotions and emotional understanding to facilitate  thinking; people who are emotionally intelligent harness emotions and work with  them to improve problem solving and to boost creativity • Physiological feedback from emotional experience is used to prioritize the  demands of our cognitive systems and to direct attention to what is most  important • Branch 3 of emotional intelligence highlights the skills needed to foster an  understanding of complex emotions, relationships among emotions, and  relationships between emotions and behavioural consequences • Appreciating the dynamic relationships among emotions and behaviours gives an  emotionally intelligent person the sense that they can better “read” a person or a  situation and act appropriately, given environmental demands • Managing emotions, branch 4, involves numerous mood regulation skills; these  skills are difficult to master because regulation is a balancing act  • The strengths of emotional regulation ski
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit