Textbook Notes (368,844)
Canada (162,200)
Biology (305)
BIOL 103 (103)
Prof. (1)
Chapter

Biology 103 Homework

8 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 103
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Winter

Description
Homework 01/29/2014 Parts of the Digestive System • Oral Cavity: obtains and processes foods Salivary Glands: secrete saliva, moistens and lubricates food, dissolves food particles for tasting,  • kills ingested bacteria, initiates digestion • Pharynx: pathway to esophagus  • Esophagus: transports food to stomach • Stomach: stores and mechanically disrupts food. Digests some proteins with pepsin • Liver: produces bile to assist in fat digestion • Gallbladder: stores bile until needed; secretes bile into small intestine • Pancreas: secretes digestive enzymes into the small intestine • Small Intestine: site of most digestion and absorption • Large Intestine: absorbs some water and minerals; prepares wastes for defecation  • Rectum: stores wastes (feces) Anus: eliminates wastes (defecation)  • Organs of the GI tract and accessory structures ­ Not all vertebrates share the same features­ some fish lack stomach, some birds lack a gallbladder Ruminants A type of herbivore that have complex stomachs consisting of multiple chambers Forestomach: three outpouchings of the lower esophagus  ­composed of rumen, reticulum and omasum  Rumen and Reticulum: storage and processing sites ­rumen and reticulum contain microbes to digest the cellulose  Omasum: absorbs water and salts from chewed and partially digested food Abomasum: where digestion takes place using acid and pepsin  Tough, partially digested food (cud), is occasionally regurgitated, rechewed and swallowed again for better  digestion Eventually, all partially digested food, microbes and by­products get to the abomasum, then passes to the  intestines to complete absorption and digestion. Some microbes remain in the rumen and quickly multiply to  replenish their populations Gizzard Birds: have no teeth In birds, the stomach is divided into two parts: Proventriculus: secretes acid and pepsinogen  Gizzard: comes after the proventriculus­ partially digested and acidified food moves here  ­Muscular structure with rough inner lining to grind foods into smaller fragments  ­Contains sand/stones swallowed by bird­ take the place of teeth and help to mash and grind ingested food:  evolved as adaptation to flight­ if bird had teeth and chewing muscles would have a less aerodynamic head Crop: dilation of the esophagus to store and soften food Cloaca: receives undigested material for excretion  Homework 01/29/2014 Absorption (page 918­919 and 931­932) ­Occurs in the first quarter of the small intestine  ­Products of digestion and vitamins and minerals (do not require digestion) are absorbed across epithelial  cells and enter the blood ­Water is absorbed via osmosis How does the small intestine absorb so well? ­Aided by infoldings and specializations along its length ­Villi (finger like projections) extend into the lumen covered in layer of epithelial cells to form small projections called microvilli­ collectively known as the brush  border ­Mucosa, villi and microvilli increase intestines surface area 600 times more than a flat tube with the same  diameter and length ­Surface area is about 300 m2 – size of a tennis court ­Due to the large surface area the epithelial cells are highly likely to absorb ­In the centre of each villi is a lacteal: special type of vessel, and capillaries ­Fats that need to be absorbed must be absorbed by the lacteal because the capillaries are far too small ­Absorption by the lacteals eventually ends in the circulatory system ­Some nutrients are absorbed by the capillaries then directly go into the veins Herbivore length of intestine > Carnivore length of intestine ­Small intestine grows within an organism to adapt to digestive challenges Homework 01/29/2014 Average human meal takes 4 hours to completely absorb Two stages of absorption: 1. absorptive state­ nutrients enter blood from GI tract 2. postabsorptive state­ GI tract is empty, body must supply energy Absorbed Carbohydrates Glucose, galactose, fructose  ­Glucose if body’s main source of energy (ATP) ­Skeletal muscle is a major consumer of glucose­ also incorporates glucose into glycogen to use later ­Excess glucose can be incorporated into glycogen in the liver or into triglycerides in fat cells Absorbed Amino Acids Taken up by all cells, then used to synthesize proteins ­Excess amino acids are converted by liver cells to glucose or triglycerides Kidne
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 103

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit