Textbook Notes (368,164)
Canada (161,688)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 202 (19)
Chapter 3

Psyc202 Chapter 3 Central Tendency.docx

3 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 202
Professor
Ronald R Holden
Semester
Fall

Description
Psyc202 Chapter 3 – Central Tendency ­ Descriptive Statistics: organize and summarize data/scores ­ Central Tendency: a statistical measure to determine a single score that defines  the center of a distribution. The goal of central tendency is to find the single score  that is most typical or most representative of the entire group. (“the average”) ­ 3 methods for measuring central tendency: mean, median, mode Mean: ­ Mean: sum of the scores divide by the number of scores (‘N’). o Mean of population = mew μ o Mean of sample = x­bar, identified by M or x̄ o Formula for population : μ= ∑X                                    N o Formula for sample:    M = ∑X   n o 2  use for mean: when don’t know the exact scores, assume the mean is  the equally distributed score for everyone. Example: a sample size of 12  with a mean of 6. Since you don’t know the individual scores, assume all  12 people have a score of 6. ­ Weighted Mean:  combining the mean of 2 or more separate groups. This mean  is not exactly the average, as it tends to be closer to one group’s average than  another.  (see notebook for solution to p.76) o Weighted Mean = Combined Sum of groups = ∑X +∑X 1 2   Combined n   =    1 + n2 ­ Changing a score or ‘n’ always changes the value of the mean. Exception: when  the new score is exactly equal to the mean. ­ If a constant value is added/subtracted from every score in the distribution, the  same constant will be added to the mean. Same thing goes with multiplication and  division (**Only if ALL scores in distribution have the same thing applied) Median: ­ Median: the score that divides a distribution in half so that 50% of the individuals  in a distribution have scores at or below the median. If scores listed in order,  median is the midpoint of the list. ­ Median calculations and notations are same for population and sample. ­ When ‘n’ is an even number, the median is found by averaging the 2 middle  scores ­ Finding Median for a Continuous Variable: o Start by creating block bar graph to represent score data. o Find precise midpoint by finding half of n (ex. N=10, so look for the score  at 5 blocks from the left) o If more than one box stacked on top of middle column, only take a  fraction of all the boxes, so that together the fractions all add up to 1. (ex.  5 boxes when we need one… use 1/5 of all the boxes.) o Draw a vertical line down these separating the used fraction of the boxes  from the unused fraction.  o Find the range of the lower real limit and the upper real limit (ex. 3.5 and  4.5 if the middle box you need is at ‘4’. Range here = 1). And multiply the  range by the fraction of boxes being used (ex. 1/5(1) = 0.2). Add that  amount to the lower real interval (ex. 3.5+0.2=3.7) and that’s where you  would draw your line; the exact middle point of the interval. o NOTE: this is only for continuous variables (like time, distance) not for  discrete variables (like number of children in a family). For discrete  variables, just list numbers and order and find middle number. Mode: ­ Mod
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 202

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit