Textbook Notes (368,780)
Canada (162,164)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 231 (65)
Chapter 4

PSYC231 Chapter 4 Adler: Individual Psychology

9 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 231
Professor
Angela Howell- Moneta
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC231 – Chapter 4: Adler: Individual Psychology  02/07/2013 Individual Psychology: Adler’s theory of personality Inferiority Feelings: The Source of Human Striving ­ Inferiority Feelings: normal condition of all people; a motivational force for behaviour and motivation  for us to strive and grow ­ Compensation: a motivation to overcome inferiority, to strive for higher levels of development ­ First experience of inferiority in infancy ▯ Feeling inferior to parents (recognized this as environmental, not  a heritable trait) ­ The Inferiority Complex: a condition that develops when a person is unable to compensate for  normal inferiority feelings These people have poor opinions of themselves, feel helpless, and are unable to cope with the demands of  life Can rise from 3 sources in childhood:  Organic Inferiority ▯ physical weaknesses (from stutter to no legs) Spoiling ▯ used to getting everything they want, followed by a shock when they enter school. Convince  themselves that the reason no one likes them/things aren’t working for them is because of a personality  deficiency Neglect ▯ lack of love, etc. ­ Superiority Complex: a condition that develops when a person overcompensates for normal  inferiority feelings. An exaggerated opinion of one’s abilities and accomplishments. May feel inwardly self­satisfied and feel no  need to demonstrate his/her superiority with accomplishments Boasting, vanity, self­centeredness & tendency to denigrate others Striving for Superiority, or Perfection ­ Striving for Superiority: the urge toward perfection or completion that motivates each of us Striving for superiority increases tension ▯ Unlike Freud, Adler didn’t think reducing tension was of great  concern to us Unlike Freud, Adler focuses on  the interrelationship between individual and society. We strive for perfection  within ourselves and within our society (appear perfect based on social standards) ­ Perfection is the ultimate goal to which we strive ­ Unlike Freud, focused on future­based motivations for behaviour ­ Fictional Finalism: the idea that there is an imagined or potential goal that guides our behaviour Our ultimate goals are potentialities, but cannot be fully actualized. They are fictional ideals that we strive  towards but can never fully achieve. These beliefs/motivations influence how we perceive and interact with others (ex. Beliefs in heaven cause  one to act more morally) The Style of Life ­ The Style of Life: a unique structure/pattern of personal behaviours and characteristics by  which each of us strives for perfection (We all express our striving differently). Basic styles of life  include the dominant, getting, avoiding, and socially useful types ­ Style of life determines which aspects of our environment we attend to/ignore and the type of  attitudes we hold. It’s the guiding framework for our behaviour ­ Learned from social interactions at a young age. Influenced by many factors including: order of  birth, nature of parent­child relationship ­ Firmly crystallized by age 4 or 5 and difficult to change thereafter ­ The Creative Power of the Self: the ability to create an appropriate style of life o Although childhood experience do have an impact on our style of life, it is how we  ourselves react to those experiences that ultimately forms our style of life (we are in control  of our destinies, not deterministic from childhood) o Argued for both heredity and environment ­ Dominant, Getting, Avoiding, and Socially Useful Styles: Adler identified universal problem and grouped them into 3: Problems involving our behaviour towards other Problems of occupation Problems of love Proposed 4 basic styles of life for dealing with these problems: Dominant type: ruling/dominant attitude & little social awareness. Little regard for others. One extreme  directly attacks others, the other attacks himself (believing attacking himself will hurt others) Getting type: expects to receive satisfaction from other people and so becomes dependent on them  (most common) Avoiding type: makes no attempt to face life’s problems Socially Useful type: cooperates with others and acts in accordance with their needs NOTE: Adler warned against classifying people into mutually exclusive categories.  Social Interest ­ Social Interest: our innate potential to cooperate with other people to achieve personal and societal  growth ­ the extent to which our potential is realized depends on our early social experiences ­ humans rely on social life and community to survive, as well as have a fundamental need to belong in  order to be healthy, well­functioning individuals ­ baby’s first contact with cooperation is its mother. The mother’s behaviour towards the infant can either  foster social interest or thwart its development ­ When associated with Freud, Adler’s work focused on power achievement and dominance. When he  broke off on his own, his work changed to focus on social and community interest Birth Order ­ Being older/younger than one’s sibling and being exposed to differing parental attitudes create different  childhood conditions that help determine personality. (Adler was amazingly accurate at guessing people’s  birth order based on their behaviour) ­ 4 possible situations: First­Born Child Happy & secure until 2  child appears First born fights to re­gain the power and attention it had before (but this is futile) ▯ may come to hate the  2  child Level of shock experienced depends on: how much the first­born was pampered before, and on how old  first­born is when second one appears (the older they are, the less shock they experience) Tend to be locked in the past, nostalgic, and pessimistic about the future More likely to reach a higher degree of intellectualness because from a young age must act as a teacher,  tutor, role model, etc. for the younger sibling Take an unusual interest in maintaining order and authority. Conservative, authoritarian, and organized. May feel insecure and hostile towards others. Adler believed that may neurotics, perverts & criminals were  first­borns  Second­Born Child Don’t feel nearly the sense of dethronement felt by first­borns if another child is born Parenting styles become more relaxed Second­born influenced by the older sibling from the beginning ▯ competition, threat, or modeling behaviour Competition may accelerate development as it encourages the second­born to reach the potential  of/surpass the first born Not as concerned with power, but more competitive and ambitious. Optimistic about the future If older siblings accomplishments are too high that they cause the child to feel inad
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit