Textbook Notes (368,391)
Canada (161,859)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 271 (57)
Chapter 14

PSYC271 Chapter 14 Sleep, Dreaming & Circadian Rhythms.docx

9 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Peter J Gagolewicz
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 14: Sleep, Dreaming, and Circadian Rhythms 14.1 Stages of Sleep ­ Three Standard Psychophysiological Measures of Sleep: ­ EEG during sleep usually high­voltage & slow waves, but low­voltage & fast  periods occur at REM sleep (rapid eye movements) ­ Loss of activity in neck muscles during REM period ­ Electroencephalogram (EEG): a measure of the gross electrical activity of the  brain, commonly recorded through scalp electrodes ­ Electrooculogram (EOG):  a measure of eye movement ­ Electromyogram (EMG): a measure of the electrical activity of muscles st ­ First­night phenomenon  ▯the disturbance of sleep observed during 1  night in  sleep lab  ­ Four Stages of Sleep EEG: ­ Alpha Waves: regular, 8­ to 12­per second, high amplitude EEG waves that  typically occur during related wakefulness and just before falling asleep  ­ Low voltage, high frequency ­ Stage 1: once asleep. Low­voltage, high­frequency continues, but slower than  wakefulness. ­ Initial Stage 1 EEG: period of stage 1 EEG that occurs at the onset of  sleep; not associated with REM ­ Progressing through stages: voltage increases, frequency decreases ­ Stage 2: 2 wave forms – K Complexes & Sleep Spindles ­ K Complexes: single large negative wave followed immediately by  single large positive wave ­ Sleep Spindles: 1­ to 2­ second waxing & waning burst of 12­ to 14­Hz  waves ­ Stage 3: intro of Delta waves: the largest and slowest EEG waves ­ Stage 4: predominantly delta waves ­ Stay in stage 4 for a while then move backwards to stage 1. Process repeated but  stage 1 different. ­ Emergent Stage 1 EEG: all period of stage 1 EEG except initial; each is  associated with REM & loss of muscle tone in body core ­ Each 4­stage cycle about 90mins long. More cycles = longer time spent in  emergent stage 1, less time spent in other stages (especially 4) ­ REM Sleep: the stage of sleep characterized by rapid eye movements, loss of  core muscle tone, and emergent stage 1 EEG ­ Stages 2­4 all nonREM ­ Slow­Wave Sleep (SWS): stages 3 & 4 of sleep, characterized by the largest  and slowest EEG waves ­ Physiological Waking Differences: increased cerebral activity (oxygen  consumption, blood flow, etc.) & increased variability in autonomic nervous  system (BP, respiration, etc.). Also muscle twitching & penis erection ­ REM Sleep and Dreaming: ­ REM associated with deep, detailed dreaming ­ NonREM associated with short, undetailed dreams ­ Testing Common Beliefs about Dreaming: ­ External stimuli can become incorporated into dreams (water example) ­ Dreams run on ‘real time’ not in an instant (subjects accurately guessed if they’d  been dreaming for 5 or 15 minutes) ­ Everyone dreams (even if they don’t remember) ­ Penile erections not associated with sexual dreams. Even occur in babies. ­ Sleep talking can occur at any stage – not just REM. Often occurs during  transition to wakefulness. Sleep walking usually occurs at stages 3 & 4 – never  occurs during dreaming (muscles relaxed while dreaming) ­ Interpretation of Dreams: ­ Freud  ▯our manifest dreams are disguises of our latent dreams ­ Activation­Synthesis Hypothesis: theory that dream content reflects the  cerebral cortex’s inherent tendency to make sense of, and give form to, the  random signals it receives from the brain stem during REM sleep 14.2 Why Do We Sleep & Why Do We Sleep When We Do? ­ Recupperation Theories of Sleep: theories based on the premise that being awake  disturbs the body’s homeostasis and the function of sleep is to restore it (ex. restore  energy levels & other homeostasis factors) ­ Focus on WHY we sleep ­ Adaptation Theories of Sleep: theories of sleep based on the premise that sleep  evolved to protect organisms from predation and accidents and to conserve energy, rather  than to fulfill some particular physiological need  ­ Focus on WHEN we sleep ­ Suggest sleep is like sex. We’re highly motivated to engage in it, but its not  necessary for health ­ Evidence for both ­ Comparative Analysis of Sleep: ­ Most mammals & birds sleep  ▯suggests sleep has physiological function ­ Predation risk & other factors led to complex sleep mechanisms: ­ Ex. dolphins – half of brain sleep at a time. Allows dolphin to resurface  for oxygen ­ Large between­species difference in sleep amounts means sleep necessary for  survival, but not necessarily needed in large quantities ­ No relationship between species energy expenditure and sleep ­ Relationship found between daily sleep time & avoidance of predators (adaptive  theory) (ex. sloths and lions) 14.3 Effects of Sleep Deprivation ­ Interpretation of the Effects of Sleep Deprivation: The Stress Problem: ­ Difficulty separating effects of sleep deprivation from effects of stress ­ Predictions of Recuperation Theories: ­ Recuperation theories assume missed sleep can be ‘regained’ ­ Two Classic Sleep­Deprivation Case Studies: st ­ 1  study: group of students  ▯sleep deprivation for 4 nights results in extreme  sleepiness between 3­6am every night. Followed by wakefulness during rest of  day, and no problem doing daily tasks. Extreme sleepiness instantly hits however  if participant sits or relaxes for any amount of time ­ 2  Study: Randy Gardner  ▯stayed awake for 11 days and only slept for 14hrs  first night he was allowed to sleep. Thereafter, returned to regular 8hr sleep  schedule  ▯lack of substantial recovery sleep is typical in sleep deprivation ­ Experimental Studies of Sleep Deprivation in Humans: ­ Moderate sleep deprivation (3­4hrs less than normal) has 3 consistent effects: ­ Increase in sleepiness ­ Negative affect ­ Poor performance on vigilance tasks (ex. watching screen or responding  when moving light flickers) ­ Effects of moderate sleep deprivation on complex cognition still not understood ­ Some cognitive functions more susceptible to sleep loss effects than others ­ Logical deduction & critical thinking not affected by sleep loss ­ Executive Function: a collection of cognitive abilities (eg. Planning,  insightful thinking, and reference memory) that appear to depend on the  prefrontal cortex ­ Influenced by sleep loss ­ Motor response not very effected by sleep loss (even severe deprivation) ­ Physiological effects of sleep loss: reduced body temperature, increased BP,  decline in some areas of immune functioning, hormonal changes, metabolic  changes ­ Little evidence that these changes hurt health or performance ­ Microsleeps: brief periods of sleep that occur in sleep­deprived subjects while  they remain sitting or standing (occur after 2­3 days of continuous sleep  deprivation) ­ Sleep­Deprivation Studies with Laboratory Animals: ­ Carousel Apparatus: an apparatus used to study the effects of sleep deprivation  in lab rats ­ Rat deprived of sleep for 12 days died. Control rat stayed alive. ­ Possible that stress killed rat, not sleep deprivation. ­ REM­Sleep Deprivation: ­ REM­sleep deprivation has 2 consistent effects: ­ REM rebound: more than usual amount of REM sleep first 2­3 nights ­ Each successive night of deprivation = greater tendency for participants  to initiate REM sequences (fall asleep faster & more frequently) ­ Compensatory increase in REM sleep following deprivation suggests that  amount of REM sleep is regulated separately from amount of slow­wave sleep  and REM sleep serves a special function. ­ Varying data on whether REM plays a role in strengthening memory ­ Default Theory of REM: it is difficult to stay continuously in nREM sleep, so  brain periodically switches to 1 of the other 2 states (REM­default, or Wake) ­ REM and waking state similar. REM occurs when no bodily functions to  take care of. ­ if REM time substituted for wakefulness, subjects not tired next day.  Explains why REM­reducing antidepressants increase nighttime  awakenings  ­ Sleep Deprivation Increases the Efficiency of Sleep: ­ Sleep deprivation leads to increased efficiency of sleep  ▯higher proportion of  slow­wave sleep (stages 3 & 4 – serve main restorative function) ­ Findings that support this: ­ Most of lost sleep regained at stage 4 ­ Sleep deprivation leads to higher proportion of slow waves ­ Getting 6hrs or less per night  ▯get as much slow­wave sleep as someone  who slept 8hrs or more ­ Taking nap after full night’s sleep does not reduce duration of following  night’s sleep ­ Reducing sleep time increases slow­wave sleep and reduces stage 1&2 ­ Waking individuals during REM barely increases sleepiness the next day.  Waking individuals during slow­wave has major effects ­ Since reduced sleep increases efficiency, it’s only possible to understand how  much sleep is truly necessary once sleep reduced to the point where its  functioning maximally 14.4 Circadian Sleep Cycles ­ Circadian Rhythms:  diurnal (daily) cycles of body function ­ Respond to temporal cues ­ Zeitgebers: environmental cues, such as the light­dark cycle, that entrain circadian  rhythms ­ Doesn’t have to be light/dark. Can be other cues like social interaction, eating,  hoarding, exercise ­ Free­Running Circadian Sleep­Wake Cycles: ­ Even if no zeitgebers (temporal cues) circadian rhythms remain ­ Free­Running Rhythms: circadian rhythms that do not depend on  environmental cues to keep them on a regular schedule ­ Free­Running Period:  the duration of 1 cycle of a free­running rhythm ­ Vary from subject to subject but usually 24.2hrs in humans ­ Humans have biological clocks that run a little slow unless entrained by light or  other temporal cues. Without cues, usually longer than 24hrs ­ Body temperature circadian rhythm synched with sleep. Sleep when body  temperature falling, rises when awake ­ Internal Desynchronization: the cycling on different schedules of the free­ running circadian rhythms of 2 different processes (ex. when sleep and body  temperature cycles desynchronize) ­ Suggests there is more than 1 circadian timing mechanism ­ Sometimes after sleep deprivation, consecutive sleep period is shorter rather  than longer  ▯internal clock –if more awake time, less sleep time ­ Jet Lag and Shift Work: ­ Jet Lag: the adverse effects on body function of acceleration of zeitgebers  during east­bound flights (phase advances) or their deceleration during west­ bound flights (phase delays) ­ In shift work, zeitgebers stay the same, but workers forced to adjust their  sleep/wake cycles ­ Both of these produce fatigue, cognitive & physical deficits ­ Adjustment typically lasts about 10 days ­ Ways to quickly adjust to jet lag: workout in morning, lots of natural light in  morning, adjusting sleep cycling before flying ­ Much more difficult to go to sleep earlier and wake up earlier (phase advance) 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit