Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 271 (57)
Prof. (9)
Chapter 8

Ch.8.docx

9 Pages
35 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Winter

Description
The sensorimotor System  04/19/2014 sensory input guiding movement  8.1 Three Principles of Sensorimotor Function  Hierarchically Organized  Association cortex to muscles  Functional segregation­ each has its own function to perform  Motor Output is guided by sensory input  Sensory feedback­ organs feed info back to circuits  Ballistic movements – brief, all or non high speed movements such as swatting a fly – not influenced by  feedback  Learning Changes the Nature and Locus of Control  Concious movements become unconscious after multiple times of practice  General Model of System Function Chapter starts at association and works its way down from there  8.2 Sensorimotor Association Cortex posterior parietal association cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal association cortex  Posterior Parietal Association Cortex  Integrating info in directing behaviour with spatial info and directing attention  Goes to dosolat and secondary motor cortex and to frontal eye field  Area that controls eye movements  Can include deficits in perception, memory of spatial relationships, reaching/grasping, eye movement  control Apraxia –  disorder of voluntary movement not attributable to motor deficit or anything else  Have trouble making movements when directed to do so  They can when they are not asked though  Contralateral neglet­  ability to respond to stimuli on the side of the body that is opposite to what has  been paralyzed  Usually with parietal damage  Egocentric left – defined by gravitational coordinates  When objects are presented in the same spot to the left they tend to look in the same spot in future tials  They could identify partial drawings viewed to right if complete versions were presented on left first  Dorsolateral Prefrontal Association Cortex  Sends projections to areas of secondary motor cortex to primary cortex and frontal eye fields  Evaluation of external stimuli and initiation of voluntary reactions to them – respons characteristics of  neurons in this area of association cortex  Some depends on characterisitcs of objects and others is the location, and some is a combination of both  Some is the response rather than the object – fire before response and continure to fire until the response  is complete – voluntary movements in this area  8.3 Secondary Motor Cortex  input from association and send to primary motor cortex supplementary motor area­ wraps over top of frontal lobe and extends down medial surface onto  longitudinal fissure  premotor cortex – rungs in strip from supplementary to lateral fissure  Identifying areas of Secondary Cortex  8 areas on each hemisphere with its own subdivisions – 3 supplemtary and two premotor and three small  areas – cingulate motor areas – in cingulate gyrus  stimulation = complex movements  Mirror Neurons  Neurons that fire when an individual performs a particular goal­directed hand movement or when they  observe the same goal directed movement performed by another  Social cognition – knowledge of perceptions, ideas and intentions of others – mapping the actions of others  onto one’s own action repertoire­ social understanding and imitation  Not yet confirmed in humans – but you can see that it exists through some studies – may play role in  pathology of disorders 8.4 Primary Motor Cortex  precentral gyrus of frontal lobe – convergence of cortical signals and point of departure of signals from  cerebral cortex  Conventional View of Primary Motor Cortex Function  Somatotopic­ motor homunculus – controlling parts of the body that are capable of intricate movements  such as hands and mount  Receives sesnsory feedback from receptors in the muscles and joints that site influences  Exception = monkeys  They have two hand areas that receives input from skin in each hemisphere  Stereognosis – identifying objects by touch  Each neuron has preferred direction  Current View of Primary Motor Cortex Function  Longer bursts or current at higher intensities – natural looking response sequences  Stimulation of one site produced feeding response – involved more than one area of the body  Firing of neurons related to the end point of movement, not direction – target movement  Signals from every point diverge greatly so each site has ability to get a body part to target location  regardless of starting point  Sensorimotor system is plastic  Effects of Lesions  Large lesions will effect ability to move one body part independently of others  Estereognosia – deficits and reduce speed, accuracy and force of movements, but they don’t completely  stop movement because of parallel pathways   8.5 Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia  Cerebellum  Receives input about descending motor signals from brain stem motor nuclei, feedback from motor  responses via somatosensory and vestibular systems – compare three sources and correct ongoing  movements  Motor learning, sequences of movements in which timing is critical  Loses ability to control direction, force, velocity and amplitude of movements and ability to adapt patterns of  motor output of changing conditions  Hard to stand, walk, balance, speech and eye movements  Basal Ganglia  Complex collection of interconnected nuclei  Neural loops that receive input from various areas and transmit it back to the cortex via thalamas  Cognitive functions in addition to their role in modulation of motor output – learning to obtain reward and  avoid punishment  8.6 Descending Motor Pathways  two descending in dorsolateral and two in the ventromedial region  Dorsolateral Corticospinal Tract and Dorsolateral Corticorubrospinal Tract   Descends through medullar pyramids then descend in the contralateral spinal white matter  dCCT­ contains Betz cells – large neurons in primary cortex  synapse on smll interneurons on spinal gray matter which synapse on motor neurons of distal muscles of  wrist, hands, fingers and toes  Individual move neurons = synapse on digit motor neurons  Red cucleus of midbrain – descend through medualla where some terminate in cranial that control face  movements and the rest continue in dCRT­ synapse on interneurons that synapse on motor neurons that  prject to distal muscles of arms and legs Ventromedial Coricospinal Tract and Ventromedial 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit