Textbook Notes (359,259)
Canada (156,137)
Psychology (900)
PSYC 280 (48)
Chapter 12

psyc 280 key concepts chapter 12.docx
psyc 280 key concepts chapter 12.docx

3 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

School
Simon Fraser University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 280
Professor
Neil Braganza
Semester
Summer

Description
Chapter 12 In humans, having only one sex chromosome—a single X—results in a condition called Turner’s  syndrome . These individuals appear to be female , in keeping with the fact that in the absence of  gonadal secretions the body will develop in a feminine pattern. Individuals with Turner’s syndrome have  recognizable ovaries , which is what would be expected in the absence of Sry protein . Human females may be exposed to early androgens as a consequence of overproduction of androgens by  the adrenals ; this condition is known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia . CAH women have  been exposed to levels of androgens intermediate between those of females and males and  often have intersexual genitalia. Such people have normal ovaries , and the müllerian system is fully  developed. CAH­affected individuals are sometimes described as tomboys; most report heterosexual  orientation as adults. In androgen insensitivity syndrome, a defect in the sole copy of a male’s androgen receptor gene,  causes the body to be completely unresponsive to androgens. The gene for the androgen receptor is carried  on the X chromosome. Wolffian ducts fail to sense testosterone and thus regress▯ external genital  tissue form labia and clitoris. Shallow vagina, lack of ovaries or uterus. Look like women.  Normal testes.  Androgen­insensitive XY individuals develop testes due to the presence of Sry protein , and  consequently they also secrete AMH , which causes the müllerian ­derived feminine structures to  regress. However, since their tissues are insensitive to androgen, the wolffian system also regresses. Due  to the insensitivity of the genital skin to androgens, the external genitalia develop into a clitoris and labia, but  the vagina is shallow . Androgen­insensitive XY individuals look and behave like normal women. They are usually attracted to and  marry men, and even after they learn of the disorder they still categorize themselves as women. They may  therefore be characterized as male with respect to their genes, female with respect to their brains, male  in their gonads, and female with respect to their genitals. This illustrates the problems inherent in selecting  criteria for classifying people as male or female. Exposing female rat pups to testosterone during a period that spans from before birth to ten days  following birth greatly reduces their lordosis responsiveness as adults. Conversely, male rats that were  castrated during the first week of life readily display lordosis behavior when treated with ovarian  hormones in adulthood. An ovariectomized adult female guinea pig given the proper regime of ovarian steroids will display normal  lordosis (sexual reflex) in response to mounting by a male. This is an example of an activational effect  of steroids; such effects are generally transient . Castrated adult males given the same treatment will  not display the same behavior. In order for a male rat to display mounting behavior in adulthood, he must be exposed to testosterone during  the perinatal period and then have circulating levels of androgens in adulthood (either from the testes or  by injection). A female treated with testosterone in adulthood may display some mounting behavior. If  she receives such treatments before and after birth and again in adulthood, she can show the entire pattern  of male copulatory behavior, including mounting, intromissions, and ejaculation . In experiments on the role of aromatization in the copulatory behavior of male rats, male rat pups were  castrated at birth and given the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a potent metabolite of  testosterone that has virilizing effects on the genitalia. DHT cannot be aromatized to estradiol. When  the treated animals reached adulthood, they had male genitalia but failed to achieve intromissions even  when treated with testosterone. However, males castrated at birth and given early estrogen treatments, followed by testosterone  treatments in adulthood, showed normal male copulatory behavior despite having sma
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 280

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit