Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
POL S101 (30)
Chapter 13

Chapter 13 Notes.docx

4 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL S101
Professor
Satish Joshi
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 13 What is sovereignty? When you are married, you learn to divide sovereignty amongst two people Can sovereignty be divided or shared on the basis of natue and importance of issues? Sovereignty is ultimate political authority & responsibility for anything and everything that is part  of the state;  you can have one person responsible for anything that goes right or wrong th th Countries are very large, if you look at the first 10 countries by size, even the 6  or 7  country in  the list is a vast territory;  The best way to imagine how big these countries are… flight b/w St.John’s to London is shorter  than Vancouver & Toronto Not just nature & importance of issues but also how well the government is trying to govern… is  the land big enough to be ruled by one sovereign authority or many? UNITARY, FEDERAL, CONFEDERAL SYSTEMS OF GOVERNANCE UNITARY SYSTEMS Canada is not a unitary system, but has some characteristics features of it Think of the UK, moving from unitary to federal The key feature is that there is one sovereign authority in  one govt    ruling over people.  Not a federation, typically called a central government There is a single London government…  A system of governing in which sovereign authority rests with the Central Government­ regional  and local governments are subordinate In terms of law/ constitution (which UK does not have)  ▯it is a unitary system, b/c  relationship  of lower governments (municipal, provincial)  ▯is  subordinate to central govt Saskatchewan bevlies that the Canadian Senate be abolished… how can a province tell a federal  government that one house of the bi­lateral federal legislature should be cancelled… provinces  are not subordinate to central government( federal system) Central govt is judicially/ hierarchically SUPREME.  Most suitable for small territories France is a prime example. Paris is the “island of power,” where all of France has concentrated  its unitary system; has never truly changed even after the Revolution FEATURES OF THE UNITARY SYSTEM: Relationship b/w different levels of governments is hierarchial with regional and local  governments being subordinate to the Central Government Suitable for countries with small territories Some devolution  ▯i.e. a system, albeit unitary in character, is also one in which the Central govt  grants some legislative and administrative responsibility to regional bodies as in the case of Spain  and France Scotland demands sovereignty from UK Canada is different, it is a mixture of unitary and federal  ▯ territories of Canada are directly  governed by federal government; Yukon/ NWT elections take place but w/o political parties.  Territories are subordinate (unitary), provinces are equal in status/ power (federal).  Territories can become provinces; e.g. Alberta in 1905  ▯Territories can become provinces in the  future…  However the Central government has the power to suspend powers given to the regional bodies They can suspend power to unitary bodies; smaller bodies exist at the discretionary of the  central power If Liberals won the federal election, Alberta will remain a primarily Conservative system  ▯in a  federation, federal government cannot expel provincial governments; central government is not  above the regional government + it’s not democratic! Can exist without a “written Constitution,”  Unitary governments can function without a constitution, federation cannot. Every time something goes wrong… someone has to take blame; look at the Constitution to  overlook division of power and who’s responsible for what There is one single sovereign government.  Advantages/ Benefits of Unitary Systems Regional interests do not get a higher priority over national developmental goals thus leading to a  more balanced development  There is a possibility of being more balanced in terms of distribution of resources No lobbying of government from different regions; can promote nationalism & unity National unity may be promoted Federation has effective unity over a large 
More Less

Related notes for POL S101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit