Textbook Notes (367,974)
Canada (161,538)
POL S101 (30)
Chapter 13

POLY CI CHAPTER 13 NOTES.docx

7 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL S101
Professor
Satish Joshi
Semester
Fall

Description
POLITICAL SCIENCES 101: CHAPTER 13 NOTES • UK is a highly centralized power. With the support of the majority it can rule over  other parties.  UK is a multinational country:  Wales, Scotland, England, Ireland.  o A referendum was held in 1997,  to debate over Scotland’s  sovereignty.;   even with a parliament the powers were limited. o The creation of Scottish and Welsh governments could break up entire  nation. o After Alex Salmond,  the leader of the Scottish national party,  one  majority in Scotland,  Scottish governments were given more power to  reduce the motion for independence o Citizens of Ireland and Scotland vote for English affairs but English  citizens cannot vote for Scottish or Irish affairs. o The United Kingdom does not have the federal system like Canada nor is  it purely unitary.  Not only are there three regional government seeking  power, but the UK is also a member of the European Union and has to  adopt the laws of this governing body. • Introduction: o Virtually every country has different nationalities, so there must be a  government to provide;  you can either delegate different responsibilities  to different regions or unify everyone under a single government o There are also a variety of international agreements that affect policies of  member states;  for example in the European Union Government policies  triumph State policies o Unitary system;  sovereign sovereign authority rests with  the central  government o Federal system:  sovereign authorities divided or shared between central  government and regional governments (this is popular in Canada and  USA,  along with Canton in Switzerland) hi • Unitary system: o Regional governments are subordinate to federal power;  of the central  government is superior to all;  regional governments have to follow the  Central Powers policies, however they may adopt their own rituals if it is  not conflict with the Central Power o  Devolution:     when regional bodies are granted   some lawmakin   Power   In the UK Scotland has some power in deciding educational  Systems health systems and law & order; however no regional  government can decide taxes  The Parliament can revoke devolution right at any point in time;   but it is unlikely because many people support devolution  In some countries,  even under a unitary system, specific regions of  lots of autonomy over themselves; for example Hong Kong  follows the basic Law  ▯“one country, two systems”  There is a tendency for Central Powers to devolve power to  regional authorities;  devolution is a response to nationalist  movements and independence (want to keep one system) • Federal system: o Regional governments are equal to central powers o Authority and responsibility is based on the Constitution o The federal government cannot be abolished by regional governments or  vice versa o Constitutional changes require the consent of both regional and federal  powers;  both governments interact with their local communities (citizens  vote for their MLA’s and MP’s) o The provinces of Canada our federal system but the territories are  unitary o  Division of Power:    Constitution gives some responsibilities to federal son to provincial o  Shared Decision Making:    Both parties have a say in legislation  In Germany the upper Parliament draft legislation that undergoes  critique my regional powers;  legislation is passed out by  Parliament but carried out by local Powers o  Intergovernmental Relation         Classical federalism:  each power concerns itself with a certain job,  without infringing on the other  Classical federalism lasted in Canada until the second world war  ▯ there was little  interaction between regional and Central power’s  When Government becomes more powerful, e.g. when it develops  a welfare state; division of power is more important • Both govt jointly involved in developing programs • Generally, Canadian govt funds specific programs, and  divides the rest of the money to give to regional powers to  spend how they see fit • Canadian government provides equalization payments to  help out poor provinces and provide more services to the  impoverished residents • Co­Operative Federalism: o Modern federal systems follow this o There is a high degree of interaction o There is often conflict in the system because nationalist policies may  conflict with the needs of the province; interests of a particular state differ  from the country as a whole o Environmental policies have been successful because both national and  provincial systems agree on it being there. • Equalization Payment o In poor parts of the country,  residents may not be able to pay for the same  luxuries (healthcare,  education)  without excessive taxation o Central government tries to redistribute wealth so that poorer regions of  the country can receive adequate services o The US does not have an equalization system;  that it allocates funds for  specific projects • Regional representation:  o Some countries have the same number representatives from each province  or state (USA/ Brazil/ Australia) o Others do not,  but offer more representation for less populated areas • Centralization and Decentralization o In some federal systems,  the central government still hold majority of  power (e.g. Australia);  o  In Canada,  the central Government is quite decentralized because  provincial governments have an impact on revenue and can legislate  accordingly o The amount of power of the central government changes with time;  the  USA was originally very decentralized federal system but gained more  power as Americans look to central power to solve economic & security  issues  Security legislations e.g. Patriot Act & No Child Left Behind give  more power to state o Decentralization in Canada is favoured to stop Quebec/ Alberta  independence movements;  • Modernization & Globalization o With more technology in transport, people would be closer tied together  and would favour a central government o This was not the case  ▯regional government was strengthened o Globalization encourages decentralization; regional governments can  make necessary trade ties based on their local goods • Asymmetrical Federalism o Regional governments have a greater power than central govt o Present in Canada through some provinces having special rights:  E.g. Quebec has special rights, has its own pension plan, has a  parental insurance plan instead of pension plan o Asymmetrical federalism allows national goovernments to effectively  negotiate the needs of its regions; this is an issue when Quebec demands  more from Canadian government, and may eventually lead to sovereignty;   Tends to reduce uniformity in programs • Community Self­Government o Linguistic or religious barriers may allow certain communities in a  country to regulate themselves, as a private membership, along with  central demands  First Nations people looking to establish their own services for  Natives; protects the people from bad governance • Benefits of the Unitary System o Best for uninational countries to unify people under one stance o Greater attention given to national issues; in federal system, politicians  may see opportunities to unfairly distribute goods to provinces based on  charisma o Central government is easily held accountable; cannot shift blame
More Less

Related notes for POL S101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit