Textbook Notes (368,728)
Canada (162,113)
Psychology (3,337)
PSYC 3850 (88)
Chapter 15

Chapter 15.docx

4 Pages
45 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3850
Professor
Norman Dubeski
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 15 Good Life, Good Death? Intro • In the 19  century, how a person died was crucial to determining how well he or she had lived • We often don’t have the opportunity to shape the end of our lvies awe  might choose  • One in three have much control over the way he/she ds • Most, died unexpectedly or by illness • The goodness of death in two out of three people is then dependent on the way it is interpreted by the  survivors.  • There is a diversity in opinion on the nature and meaning of death. • Many people believe that a good life prepares for a good death • “life” and “death” have always been companion  ( they are both intrinsically related)  • Appropriate death = death we would choose for ourselves if we had the choice. • Erikson’s theory – theory of death anxiety 3 Paths to death 1. World trade center o Considered a “horrendous death” o Victims had done nothing to provoke it o No time for the victims to prepare o Families were shattered, burdened with grief, deprived of companionship and support. 2. Socrates’ Death o Father of philosophical thought o Considered a “bad death” o Miscarriage of justice, silence one of humankind’s greatest thinkers, depriving a great but  troubled city­nation of invaluable citizen  3. AIDS o Considered a “tainted pathway to death” o The symptoms are stressful, painful, and eventually debilitating o Rejected by society “social death” to an extreme A Father Dies: A Mission Begins • Ira Byock: founder of American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and leading advocate for  improved care of terminally ill people • Question – how do you relate to a person who has become dependent on a life­support system?  (Consciousness and responsiveness are impaired) • Byock’s father was dependent on such a system and eventually recovered from it. o When he did die, it was a home peacefully with family • Byock’s concern: how people’s deaths are often chaotic due to our need to prolong life (ambulance,  sirens and CPR). • Byock believes that a good death is more likely to occur within a supportive interpersonal framework  and without medical intervention.  A Shift in the Meaning of Life and Death ­  5 alternative : 1. Death is an enfeebled form of life o Death is regarded as a release from infirmity, suffering and indignity o Common types: suicide, systematic degradation and silent withdrawal from life 2. Death is a continuation of life o The Christian view o Salvation vs. damnation 3. Death is a perpetual development o Many see it as a time for enrichment o Elderly men and women may become more active, vigorous and strongly engaged in life o “Finally discovering who I am after all these years and having the time of my life” o regret theory: death anxiety suggests that people who consider themselves to have a full and  satisfying life are less anxious about death 4. Death is waiting o Death as a spoilsport who turn out the lights and says “the party’s over” before we are ready to  go. 5. Death is cycling and recycling o People die in order for others to have a chance to live  The Golden Rule Revised  • Should: Do unto others as we would have done unto ourselves • Observational: Everyday I see self­interest, malice and indifference in human interactions” • From so much suffering and death, the golden rule is flagrantly disregarded, and horrendous death  becomes a prospect when we do not feel a basic bond with people • Division of the human race into US and THEM as been common mindset throughout history o We may feel we should do right by others if they are not really others o Although there are positive signs that we can develop a willingness and ability to feel ourselves a  part of the total human community.  Are we Live or on Tape? – Virtual Reality • We have moved from real­time to virtual time • Fact: the ear processes the sound in the same way whether the message comes live or on tape, or from  the living or the dead. • Time rules: no mater how clever or religious we might be, time will takes its own course and with that  course, all that we hold dear, including life itself.  o Challenge: we can convert immediate experience to the 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3850

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit