Textbook Notes (369,072)
Canada (162,367)
CMN3133 (20)
Chapter

CMN 3133 Reading #2.docx

9 Pages
100 Views

Department
Communication
Course Code
CMN3133
Professor
herrara-vega

This preview shows pages 1,2 and half of page 3. Sign up to view the full 9 pages of the document.
Description
CMN 3133: Reading #2 Sept 19 2013  Introduction   Communication between the ruling organizations of a society and the people is central to any political  system.  Perform the role of an activator; it cannot simply be a series of edicts to society from the elite, ruling group  but must allow feedback from society and encourage participation.  Modern democracies need to be increasingly responsive to their publics, and at the heart of  responsiveness is a dialogue  However, such definition would not be completely appropriate for many modern states, particularly given the  pole of the media. These are, firstly, the political sphere ‘itself: the state and its attendant political actors.  . Each of these organizations and groups communicate messages into the political sphere, in the hope or  having some level of influence Finally, there are the media outlets, the media communicates about politics,  influencing the public as well as the political spheres.  In other words, they if what they want when they want but are influenced by one another And may well be  led by one particular group when formulating Arguments, opinions, policies, perceptions or attitudes.  France, was allowed sanction to invade Such communication is prevalent across the world today, between  states and within states, at theheart of which is persuasion: that the receiver should act in a way desired by  the sender. In order that the people can make the choice of who to elect, each competitor must communicate to them  effectively.  Therefore political communication is often placed central to debates on the health md well­being of our  democracy and the styles and levels of interaction we often used as a measure of the strength of public  approval and engagement in the political system  Furthermore, across all democracies, there are a greater number of political voices, both elective and non­ elective competing for the ear of the public.  This makes political communication an increasingly complex business, not only as an area of academic  study but also in the way it is practiced.  The Democratic State:   Democratic states are defined by the institutionalization of free, fair and regular elections that do not debar  anyone from participating, whether as voters or candidates, on grounds that are unreasonable: in the 21st  centurv these would include race and ethnic background, gender and political beliefs.  Those we elect are our representatives; they use their political power, given by the people through the vote,  on behalf of the people This is the fundamental concept of a representative democracy: to ensure a broad  range of people, and their views, are represented; made possible byboth state and society supporting  pluralism of views and access to the media Debates on the effectiveness of this system   In a representative democratic state there are various tiers, or levels, political power. Broadly speaking  these can be separated between national and local; however, there are state differences Outside of the elected political structure are pressure groups representing those voters who share a single  special interest; they can be representatives of workers in one industry, such as trade unions or  professional associations, or they may be businesses or they may be businesses or industrial  representatives.  Communication from and between these groups is essential to the health of democracy, though the  diffusion of power can mean that their views can remain marginalized and they may be forced to take action  that gains them greater attention than they would normally be awarded: workers can withdraw their labour,  interest groups can hold demonstrations, marginalized groups can resort to terror tactics.  One further powerful group exists outside of the political system: the broadcast and print media, collectively  known as ‘the media’. The media act both as the communicator of political views from all groups in a state  and as a watchdog that calls political actors to account for their actions.  1. Alternatively, Norris (2000) argues that the media play an important role in upholding the democratic  nature of a ‘Society and strengthening pluralism.  2. Others take the view that the media an fall under political control, and so weaken pluralism through  offering a biased perspective. 3.Finally, there is the view that the media report only what they feel is important, that through the selection  of news values, framing and agenda­setting, the public fail to receive sufficient information on which to base  their voting decision ,and some views become excluded due to their lack of fit to the media frames,  agendas and values. We live in a media centered democracy  Political communication is as old as political activity; it was a feature of ancient Greece and the Roman  Empire as well as across diverse politics systems in the modern age. Democratization of the majority of the political systems changed the nature of political communication and  political activity moved into the public sphere. The people became involved in politics because they were   expected to have a political role  Communication between the various groups, electoral and non­electoral, became competitive; each vying  for space in the media and the attention of the people Thus we find more complex models for  understanding modern political communication.  Figure 2 demonstrates the lines of communication that, theoretically, are open between each group. How  communication is made may vary and how audible the message is can be dependent upon the size of any  group or level of support for a party, group or cause and the tactics used to get the message across.  However, in a pluralist society, at least in theory, all groups will communicate among themselves and  between one another. The process by which political communication is carried out has evolved, become more technically and  technologically sophisticated and adopted techniques from the worlds of corporate advertising and  marketing in order to compete in the modern information­rich society Technology, however, not only effected political communication in the 20th century. The invention of the  printing press allowed Thomas More to attack the inequality in 15th­century England.  • Every election across the democratic world will see leafleting, and many argue that such activities a
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1,2 and half of page 3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit