Textbook Notes (359,259)
Canada (156,137)
Psychology (1,005)
PSY2105 (96)
Chapter 11

Chapter 11.docx

4 Pages
150 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of Ottawa
Department
Psychology
Course
PSY2105
Professor
David Collins
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 11  Language ­ Properties of language o Productivity:  property of language that lets humans to produce and understand an  infinite number of statements  o Variety  Children learn the different languages they are exposed too ­ There are approximately 3000 different languages ­  What is language? o A system of symbols that stand for other entities  o It has a hierarchal structure   Sentence­phrase­words­phenomenon o There are rules that specify how units at one level can be formed to produce at the next  level (grammar) ­ It is a complicated system of rules that allows us to communicate verbally  ­ Language is unlikely to just be genetic because: o Productivity (capacity) of languages involve a lot of messages that are not likely to be  passed along genetically  o Adopted children do not speak the same language as their biological parents Theories of Language Development ­ Early learning approach o Environmental theory (B.F Skinner)  The acquisition of learning was a function of learning  Children are supported for imitation of adult speech but punished for poor  language effort ­ Nativist theory (Noam Chomsky) o Nativist theory: put a heavy emphasis on inborn processes and biological mechanisms  o There must be a biological process because children learn language rapidly and easily  during a period when their cognitive skills are not fully developed  o They are against Skinner that language is learned by rewards, punishments, and imitation o Another reason they shut down the environmentalist point of view is because the  language we speak is very complex and adults don’t teach children the complexity of the  language. They already have it from specific brain mechanisms separate for cognitive  processes.  o Language has two structures:  Surface structure: the way words and sentences are arranged in spoken  language   Deep structure: the inborn knowledge that humans possess about the properties  of language  o Language acquisition device (LAD): a brain mechanism, that when a child hears any  kind of speech, this brain mechanism starts to develop a transformational grammar that  translates surface structure into deep structure that the child can understand o Deaf children go by their own signs (generic to all other deaf children) to communicate.   Their sequences were not a syntax (arrangement) of their parents language   The surface structure is the syntax of the spoken language and the syntax used  by the children to communicate was the deep structure, that did not need to be  learned o Syntax  How words are arranged into phrases  ­ Environmental/learning approaches o Modeling and observational learning might actually play a factor o Looks at more cognitively oriented theories rather than the operant conditioning model  o Infant­directed speech: simplified speech spoken by adults or older children directed  toward the younger child  Originally called motherese o Parents respond to ungrammatical with a variety of forms of feedback and instruction ­ Cognitive­developmental models o A child’s early knowledge and concepts play a role in language development ­ Sociocultural approaches o They think the main reason children want to learn language is for social interaction  o The emphasis is on pragmatics (the uses to which language is put) o Language acquisition support system (LASS): process where parents provide children  with help in learning language  Main component is format  The Preverbal Period ­ speech perception o phonology: the study of speech sounds o phoneme: a sound difference that changes the meaning  o car and core represent different phoneme categories o categorical perception: when infants are able to tell the difference when two sounds  represent two different phonemes o infants are able to make difficult phonemic discriminations (“r” and “l”) ­ listening preferences o infants prefer the sound of their mothers voice over others o deaf mothers or deaf children use slower and more exaggerated sign language to  communicate as a variation of the infant­directed speech o when parents talk “baby talk” to their child, it is more likely their child is paying  attention than if they were talking normally o infant directed speech can help the infant in learning to discriminate phonemic categories ­ early sounds o cooing: begins at about 2 months when babies produce one­syllable vowel sounds, like  “oo” and “aa” o reduplicated babbling: beings at about 6 months when infants produce strings of  identical sounds, like babababa o after the end of their first year, they start to put together more than one sound, like da­doo o babbling is similar for infants who speak different languages o babbling drift: hypothesis that says that the infants babbling will slowly move toward  the language they hear and will soon speak o infants who are deprived from babbling are late when speaking, but there is one type of  babbling that does not need vocal skills  sign language ­ gestures and non­verbal responses o a basic function of language i
More Less

Related notes for PSY2105

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit