Textbook Notes (368,796)
Canada (162,165)
Psychology (1,066)
PSY2110 (40)
Chapter 4

Chapter 4.docx

5 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY2110
Professor
Dave Miranda
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 4 Social Perception: study of how we form impressions of other people and make  inferences about them  Nonverbal Behavior ­ nonverbal communication: how people communicate, intentionally or  unintentionally without words.  ­ The capacity to mimic others can be proven scientifically. We use mirror neurons  when we perform and action and when we see another person perform the same  action.  ­ Facial expression and behavior o Encode: expressing or emitting nonverbal behavior  o Decode: interpreting the meaning of non verbal behavior given by others o Darwin believed that nonverbal communication were species­specific and  not culture­specific o Perceiving an angry or happy face would depend on the person’s gender.  o According to Ekman, the following emotions are universal:  Anger  Happiness  Surprise  Fear  Disgust   Sadness o The judgement of a given facial expression depended on what other faces  were presented.  o The situation can also affect the way the person reads another persons  facial expression of emotion  o Whether you are a holistic or analytic thinker influences the perception of  facial expressions of emotion o Why is decoding sometimes inaccurate?   Affect blends: facial expression in which one part of the face  registers one emotion while another part of the face registers  another emotion. For example, when someone tells you something  horrible and disgusting at the same time.   Can be inaccurate because people display this when they are trying  to appear less emotional than they actually are so people don’t  know how they really feel   It can also be inaccurate due to culture and nonverbal  communication: • Display rules (culturally determined rules about which  emotional expressions are appropriate to show) are  particular to each culture  • the more individualistic a culture is, the more likely it is  that the expression of emotion is encouraged whereas in  collectivist cultures, moderation is prescribed  • eye contact and eye gaze (form of nonverbal  communication) are channeled by culture as well. For  Americans, if you don’t look someone in the eye it is  considered rude, but in other parts of the world, it’s  considered disrespectful to stare them in the eye.  • Culture also plays a role in personal space as well as hand  and arm gestures (forms of nonverbal communication) • Emblems: nonverbal gestures that have a well­understood  verbal definition. Ex, the middle finger  • In conclusion, a gesture in one culture may not mean  anything in another. And the same nonverbal behavior can  exist in two cultures, but can mean very different things.  Implicit personality theories: Filling in the blanks ­ implicit personality theory: a type of schema people use to group different kinds  of personality traits together. Ex. If someone is kind, he or she must be generous  as well.  ­ Culture and implicit personality theories  o One cultures implicit personality theory can be different to another   Ex. Americans think that someone who is physically attractive  must also be kind and gentle, whereas Chinese people (collectivist  culture) thought people in their community were more attractive  than good looking people in general  o Different cultures have different ideas about personality types   Ex. Western cultures, we have an artistic personality but in China  they don’t have that kind of personality. They have shi gu,  something the western culture doesn’t have.  Casual Attribution: Answering the “Why” Question  ­ attribution theory: the way in which people explain the causes of their own and  other people’s behavior  ­ Fritz Heider is the referred to as the father of the attribution theory  o He says you can make two attributions to why people behaved the way  they did:  Internal attribution: inference that a person is behaving a certain  way because of something about her, like her attitude or  personality   External attribution: inference that a person is behaving a certain  way because of the situation he or she is in.  o He says that people prefer internal attributions rather than external ones.  We look at the people more than  we look at the situation.  o The Covariation model: Internal vs. External Attributions:  We notice and think about more than one piece of information  when we form an impression of someone.   Covariation model: form any attribution about what caused a  person’s behavior. We systematically examine multiple instances  of behavior, occurring at different times and in different situations.   When forming an attribution, we gather information to help us 
More Less

Related notes for PSY2110

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit