Textbook Notes (368,430)
Canada (161,877)
Sociology (180)
SOC1101 (93)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3.docx

2 Pages
55 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC1101
Professor
Liam Kilmurray
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3: Culture CULTURE AND SOCIETY:  The Importance of Culture • Culture is essential for our individual survival and our communication with other people. We rely on culture because we aren’t born with certain information that we need to survive • Fundamental for the survival of the societies. Societies need rules about civility and tolerance towards others. What we do as humans is based on “nature” versus “nurture” • An instinct is unlearned biologically determined behaviour patterns. Predictably occurs whenever certain environmental conditions exist. Humans do not have instincts. • We do have reflexes (unlearned, biologically determined involuntary response to a physical stimulus, example: sneezing) and drives (unlearned, biologically determined impulses common to all members of a species that satisfy  needs, example: sleeping) • Culture and social learning account for almost all behaviour. Ann Swidler – culture is a “tool kit of symbols, stories, rituals, worldviews people use to solve different kinds of problems” Material and Nonmaterial Culture: • Material culture: Consist of the physical or tangible creations (clothing, shelter, art…) o Technology: Knowledge, techniques, and tools that make it possible for people to transform resources into usable forms. Both concrete and abstract. Material culture is a buffer against the environment (shelter,  raincoat) • Nonmaterial culture: Consists of the abstract or intangible human creations of society, such as attitudes, beliefs, and values that influence peoples behaviour Cultural Universals: • Customs and practices that occur across all societies. All humans face the same basic needs, we engage in similar activities when related to our survival.  • They ensure smooth continual operation of society. These practices have been imposed by members of one society on members of another COMPONENTS OF CULTURE: • All cultures have four common nonmaterial cultural components: symbols, language, values, and norms. • Symbols: Anything that meaningfully represents something else. Culture could not exist without symbols because there would be no shared meanings among people. o Produce loyalty and animosity, love and hate. Flags stand for a lot. Within technology you use emoticons. Gestures are symbolic. Symbols affect our thoughts about class • Language: A system of symbols that expresses ideas and enables people to think and communicate with one another. Verbal and nonverbal. Can create visual images in our heads o Language is not solely a human characteristic but others aren’t physically endowed with the vocal apparatus. This skill helps humans transmit culture to future generations  Language and social reality: • Sapir­Whorf hypothesis: Proposition that language shapes its speakers’ view of reality • Many people agree that this hypothesis overstates the relationship between language and thoughts and behaviour patterns • Language may influence our behaviour but it does not determine it  Language and gender: • The English language ignores women by using the masculine form the refer to human beings in general (mankind) • Use of the pronouns he and she affects our thinking about gender • Words have positive connotations when relating to male power, prestige, and leadership • We have a language based predisposition to think of women in sexual terms • Many organizations have established guidelines for the use of non­sexist language. People resist change, arguing that the language is being ruined  Language, race, and ethnicity: • Words may have more than one meaning, create negative images. Ex: black hearted… Derogatory words have been popularized through language • Words reinforce perceptions about a group. Using a passive voice in certain circumstances is also derogatory  Language diversity in Canada: • French versus English language issues have been a significant source of conflict over the years • Aboriginal peoples’ cultures are oral, only transmitted through speech. In residential school they were forbidden to speak their language  • Now these languages are among the most endangered in the world. The loss of their language will result in loss of their culture • Steps to preserve these languages would be to incorporate them into courses in school, media programs, and recording their stories • Factionalists say its essential to have a shared language. Conflict theorists view language as a source of power and social control • Values: Collective idea about what is right or wrong, good or bad, and desirable or undesirable in a particular culture o Provides us with the criteria by which we evaluate people, objects, and events o Value contradictions:  Values that conflict with one another or are mutually exclusive (achieving one makes it difficult, or impossible, to achieve another) o Ideal versus real culture:  Ideal culture: The values and standards of behaviour tha
More Less

Related notes for SOC1101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit