Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
POLC71H3 (10)
Wald (1)
Chapter

Thoreau Summarized

2 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLC71H3
Professor
Wald
Semester
Winter

Description
Thoreau on Civil Disobedience                    "Civil Disobedience" is an analysis of the individual’s relationship to the state that focuses on  why men obey governmental law even when they believe it to be unjust. It questions the  legitimacy of the state and implores its subjects to act in accordance to themselves and not the  law.  Background, how he became the man he was… But "Civil Disobedience" is not an essay of abstract theory. It is Thoreau’s extremely personal  response to being imprisoned for breaking the law. Because he detested slavery and because tax  revenues contributed to the support of it, Thoreau decided to listen to his conscience. There were  no income taxes and Thoreau did not own enough land to worry about property taxes; but there  was the hated poll tax – a capital tax imposed on all adults within every community. Thoreau declined to pay the tax and so, in July 1846, he was arrested and jailed. He was  supposed to remain in jail until a fine was paid which he also declined to pay. Without his  knowledge or consent, however, relatives settled the “debt” and a disgruntled Thoreau was  released after only one night. The incarceration may have been brief but it has had enduring  effects through "Civil Disobedience." The essay was Thoreau’s response to his 1846  imprisonment for refusing to betray his conscience. To understand why the essay has exerted  such powerful force over time, it is necessary to examine both Thoreau the man and the  circumstances of his arrest. Ideology: Conscience vs The General Will (1) Why do some men obey laws without asking if the laws are just or unjust; and,  (2) why do others obey laws they think are wrong? Before Thoreau’s imprisonment, when a confused taxman had wondered aloud about how to  handle his refusal to pay, Thoreau had advised, “Resign.” If a man chose to be an agent of  injustice, then Thoreau insisted on confronting him with the fact that he was making a choice. As  Thoreau explained, It is, after all, with men and not with parchment that I quarrel, – and he has voluntarily chosen to  be an agent of the government. This is the key to Thoreau’s political philosophy. The individual is the final judge of right and  wrong. During his day­long imprisonment, Waldo Emerson came to visit him and called his  imprisonment ‘pointless’. According to some accounts, Emerson visited Thoreau in jail and  asked, “Henry, what are you doing in there?” Thoreau replied, “Waldo, the question is what are  you doing out there?” Emerson was “out there” because he believed it was shortsighted to protest  an isolated evil; society required an entire rebirth of spirituality. Thoreau on Civil Disobedience                    Emerson missed the point of Thoreau’s protest, which was not intended to reform society but  was simply an act of conscience. If we do not distinguish right from wrong, Thoreau argued that  we will eventually lose the capacity to make the distinction and b
More Less

Related notes for POLC71H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit