Textbook Notes (280,000)
CA (170,000)
UTSG (10,000)
ANT (200)
Chapter 4

ANT253H1 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Sociolect, Speech Community, Jargon


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT253H1
Professor
Marcel Danesi
Chapter
4

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 15 pages of the document.
Chapter 4: Variations in Social Space
Introduction:
Purpose of chapter looking at various aspects of sociolectal variation in F2F
and CMC spaces.
Dealing with sociolinguistic phenomena such as slang, Jargon, cants,
registers, styles, and language codes.
The variant forms of speech are called social dialects, extending the
traditional grographical notion of dialect to encompass variation in the
social domain. They are now also commonly called sociolects.
4.1-Sociolects
Speech community- a group of people sharing a common language or dialect.
To be considered a part of speech community, an individual need to
have communicative competence, that is, the ability to use language
(or dialect) in a way that fits the situation.
Speech communities are based on specific forms of language, indicating that
people use language to convey their connection to distinct groups, from
professional organizations, who speak what is called a jargon, to groups such as
school cliques, families, and gangs, which often speak slang.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

People use slang more often in speaking than in writing, and more often with
friends than strangers.
Slang bespeaks of friendliness and commonality; jargon does not.
Slang expressions become colloquialisms, that is , expressions used in everyday
conversation that are not considered appropriate for formal speech or writing.
Jargon and slang are variants of a language that are produced by social
variation, not variation geographical variation.
4.1.1-Slang
Slang is a version of language that crystallizes in certain periods of societys
history, typically arising within certain groups or communities for reasons of
groups solidarity or allegiance.
There is general and group-based slang
Features of the former usually emerge in special situations
The latter are for showing allegiance to a group.
Cants and argots are also group-based slangs, showing allegiance to the
criminal group, at the same time that they allow messages to be secretive and
undecipherable by the authorities.
We hardly realize that colloquialisms such as Lonny or chill out have become
so much a part of our everyday lexicon that we no longer realize that they
originate from slang.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Tag questions-a question that ends with a tagged on phrase that is designed to
seek approval, agreement or consent.
Hedge- a word or phrase that makes utterances less forceful.
Its kinda good to say this.
She sort of said that
Filler- a sound or word that indicates to other interlocutors that the speaker has
not finished speaking, but has simply paused to gather his or her thought.
Common fillers are:
Like/you know/well/so
Quotative-a word or expression that introduces a quotation
Hes like: I didnt say that. / And shes like: Oh yes, you did.
Slang that is diffused through the media has social appeal and is often used as a
symbol of social trends.
Slang is often transgressive of norms and standard language distinctions. A
word such as guys is now used by both males and females to refer to their
gender peers equally, going contrary to its meaning.
Slang is also a trace to how people modify speech in accordance with social
changes.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version