Identities & Issues: The Social And Economic Setting

6 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL214Y1
Professor
Jeffrey Kopstein
Semester
Fall

Description
POL214 Jan 6/2014 LEC #10 Identities & Issues: The Social And Economic Setting Socio Economic Status? –who a people are, what they do/jobs/earnings?; state of their well­ being/welfare, different economic structures across the country  1. Fault Lines (3) ­Brooks; 3 enduring fault lines in Canadian politics; been here from the beginning of Canada and  continue to inform Canada’s politics (a) Rift between English and French­goes back to 1759­1760 when British defeated French on  Plains of Abraham, where French gave up Quebec and Acadia to the British Crown. French  Canadians at this point were a subjugated minority, but in Quebec they were a large majority and  occupied Quebec and most of Ontario; but they were treated like second class citizens as  occupations etc. were controlled by Anglo­Canadians; Religious ParallelQuebec was Catholic,  Anglo­Canadians were mainly Protestant, these cleavages reinforced this division, but this  religious division means nothing now. There were very strong anti­French feelings before. ­19  century, French were anxious about preserving their culture/language, etc. because there  was anglo­dominance; today their economics are left to them, but there is still concerns about  recognition and preserving their language and culture; there has been a movement for  sovereignty (35­40% of Quebeckers) because of this (b) Canadian­America Relationship­Canada’s colonial relationship; Canada was originally a  colony of France, then with the victory of the British, became a colony of Britain; in recent  decades (since 1920’s) there have been growing concerns that Canada is a social, political and  economic colony of the USA; concern was that USA might want to annex/take over Canada  th (concern in the 20  century); there is now fear of USA taking over Canadian culture and  Canadian economy, Canada has done a lot to defend its cultural industries ­Canada very much a product of the American Revolution; large #s of people who were loyalists  to Britain moved to Canada; They became the core of English Canada; the Loyalists were the  creators of Upper Canada; A new colony (upper Canada) under John Simcoe was established.  ­Canadians are not clear about how to define themselves but one way they are sure of defining  themselves as “not Americans” although they used to define themselves as British (c) Regionalism­ Canada formed in 1867, the West wasn’t part of Canada, but the Maritimes  were, as well as QB and Ontario. They had a very strong sense of regional identity, this is why  Canada has regionalismAtlantic Canadians didn’t want to join at first but then did after. ­There is very strong identification with Province; not so much Ontario (weak identification) but  in Atlantic Canada (esp. NWFLND) very strong Page 1 of 6 POL214 Jan 6/2014 LEC #10 Identities & Issues: The Social And Economic Setting ­differences in identities leads to power struggles because different regions have more members  than others; they feel the agenda of the parliament is driven by central Canada, and the  surrounding provinces are outliers, or have felt this way  *in the last decade, new fault lines have appeared: feminism/gender issues; aboriginal rights; the  environment; globalisation (about how integrated they want to be in terms of trade treaties with  other countries); visible minorities and non­visible minorities (this term seems oxymoronic ­at the beginning of the century there was a lot of focus on the divisions based on classdivision  between bosses and workers; management and labourers, between capital and labour, as time has  gone by this tension has seemed to subsided; our concept of class is often changed, before when  people talked about class, they talk about their relationship to the means of production; now it’s  in terms of incomes (but income is just one approach to analyzing class)  2. Systems Analysis ­ “A political system can be designated by interactions through which values are authoritatively  allocated”—Easton; System based off the structure of an electrical circuit; inputs and outputs,  also through­puts;  ­demands (inputs) are informed by what you see such as public opinions/what the media are  writing about/what interest groups want; with support (public opinion)mediated; not perfectly  turned into outputs i.e. parliament decides how fast things gooutputs (allocative—like the  budget (specific) or to send troops to Afghanistan or symbolic –a statement; not putting out  anything but introduces a charter of rights and freedoms, or Canada recognizes gender equality  etc. but feedback (term comes from electrical engineering); once you have outputs there’s  feedback that pushes back  ­where does the socio­economic environment fit in? The kinds of demands and supports you get  are influenced by the broader environment; wouldn’t have interest groups pushing for things if  these groups didn’t exist in the country ­problems? The boundaries between the environment/values and supports or even between  demands and supports are very fuzzy; Easton’s model is a­historical, it doesn’t show how  Canada has evolved into the way it is today (so much of what goes on in our politics is a function  of the past, there is no past in electrical engineering). This is just one way of thinking about how  politics operates  3. Material Well­Being ­on the whole, Canadians are privileged by a number of international indicators; Canada is in an  elite group of well­off countries; quality of life measure is #2 in the world after Australia;  Page 2 of 6 POL214 Jan 6/2014 LEC #10 Identities & Issues: The Social And Economic Setting @Brooks in purchasing power parity, Canada is #15; this doesn’t mean very much because this  can be simply related to the dollar and it’s not a good indicator of much beyond that; there are a  lot of poor people in Canada but they are privileged in the sense that there are welfare programs  that aid the poor, everyone is entitled to see the doctor, if unemployed you can get  unemployment insurance, income supplements, working there is the Canada Pension Plan;  Canada is inside of an elite club of rich states; high standard of living but nothing is complacent;  lots of manufacturing and resources here; unemployment for the last 40 years~ has gone from  6% to 13%, today it’s just below 7% but usually it’s 6­9% ­jobs Canadians have: @Confederation, more than half of the occupied labour force was  involved in the primary sector (fishing, farming, forestry, mining; ~4­5% Canadians employed  here); as Canadian economy developed, a secondary sector developed (manufacturing, factories,  construction, some include transportation; 25% Canadians employed here), tertiary sector  (service sector; 75% Canadians employed here) ­What does it mean if the service sector is so large? Bankers, professors, waiters are all part of  the tertiary sector but make different wages; it’s not indicative of material well­being as it once  was  ­because of these differences, there might also be differences in the kinds of demands and  supports
More Less

Related notes for POL214Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit