Textbook Notes (368,125)
Canada (161,663)
Astronomy (194)
Prof (17)
Chapter 12

Textbook Notes chapter 12.docx

6 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Astronomy
Course
Astronomy 2021A/B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Fall

Description
04/16/2014 12.1 Drake equation astronomer Frank Drake tried to summarize the factors that would determine whether any attempt to detect  intelligent extraterrestrials could succeed. He came up with a simple equation that, at least in principle, could be used to calculate the number of  civilizations existing elsewhere in our galaxy (or in the universe at large) from which we could  potentially get a signal. The Drake equation, as it is now called, does not give us a definitive answer for the number of  transmitting civilizations. Rather, it lays out the factors that are important in determining this number. Number of civilizations N( HP) *f(life)f(  civf(*  now) N HP is the number of habitable planets in the galaxy.  flife is the fraction of habitable planets that actually  have  life.  fciv is the fraction of the life­bearing planets on which a civilization capable of  interstellar communication  has at some time  arisen.  fnow is the fraction of the civilization­bearing planets that happento have a  civilization  now,  as opposed to, say, millions or billions of years in the past.  To summarize, the Drake equation gives us a way to calculate the number of civilizations capable of  interstellar communication that are currently sharing the Milky Way Galaxy with us. As such, it provides a  useful way of organizing our thinking about the problem, because it tells us exactly what numbers we need  to know to learn the answer. Indeed, it suffers from only one significant drawback: We don’t know precise  values for any of its terms!  12.2 The evolutionary argument in favor of widespread intelligence is based on the phenomenon of  convergent evolution, the tendency of organisms of different evolutionary backgrounds that occupy  similar ecological niches to resemble one another. (ex. Eyesight, streamlined body form for sharks and  dolphins) natural selection often produces analogous adaptations.  intelligence—the way an animal processes information—is subject to natural selection Those animals whose brain mass falls on this line are said to have an encephalization quotient  (EQ) of 1, which means a typical allotment of mental ability for creatures of their size. If their brain mass falls above this line, then it seems reasonable to suppose that they are capable of more  elaborate behavior. Creatures whose brain mass falls below the line are presumably less mentally agile  than average animals in this sample. The EQ, the brain mass relative to the value on the line EQ = 1,  serves as an indicator of general intelligence. measuring EQ has the advantage of being fast and easy. EQ also has the advantage of being something  we can compute for extinct species Carniv­ orous animals that need to hunt down their meals generally have higher EQs than leaf eaters, and  animals that lavish care on their offspring score higher than those that ignore them. Humans are not closely related to dolphins in an evolutionary sense, so the fact that they have also  developed large brains suggests that there is real survival value in cleverness, and that there are many  ways that nature can produce it. Was this a lucky accident, or was it inevitable that some culture would develop modern technology? Again, a single example—what happened on our own planet—cannot guarantee that science and  technology will be common in the cosmos, even if high intelligence is. 12.3 SETI means "Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence" One of these pioneers was Guglielmo Marconi (1874–1937), generally celebrated as the man who made  radio practical. The other was Nikola Tesla (1856–1943) Tesla­most enduring legacy was the use of alternating current (AC) for distributing electrical power. “whistlers,” electrical noise created by distant lightning discharges. (which Tesla mistook as greeting from  aliens) 1920s, the signals that Marconi heard may also have been “whistlers” from distant lightning, or possibly  garbled U.S. Navy broadcasts of which he was unaware. They were conducted at relatively low frequencies, which have problems penetrating Earth’s ionosphere—a  layer of the upper atmosphere that consists of particles ionized by sunlight The beginning of modern SETI is gener­ ally attributed to two physicists working at Cornell University. 1959  Giuseppe Cocconi and Philip Morrison That range of transmit­ ted frequencies is called the bandwidth of the signal. As a practical matter, the  bandwidth is governed by how much information the broadcast contains. (ex. Radio 
More Less

Related notes for Astronomy 2021A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit