Textbook Notes (367,754)
Canada (161,370)
Astronomy (194)
Prof (17)
Chapter 11

Textbook chapter 11.docx

6 Pages
64 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Astronomy
Course
Astronomy 2021A/B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Fall

Description
04/16/2014 11.1 Our modern definition of a star is a large ball of gas that generates energy by nuclear fusion in its hot central co e. Our Sun shines as a star because it fuses  hydrogen into helium in its core. proto star­  before the star’s center gets hot enough to ignite nuclear fusion, the unfinished star life cycle­begins with the star’s formation in a giant cloud of gas. A star is “born” when nuclear fusion begins in its central core. A star “dies” when it finally ceases  to produce energy by any kind of fusion. Stars shine fairly steadily during this period, brightening gradually as they age a star that exhausts its core hydrogen begins to grow larger and brighter, becoming a  giant  supergiant  star. For example, when our own Sun becomes a red  giant some 4–5 billion years from now, it will grow so large that it will engulf some of the inner planets. Stars can begin to fuse heavier elements during their giant or super­ giant stages. Eventually, the star will reach a point where it can fuse no other ele­ ments, and at that point the star dies. Low­mass stars­die relatively gently, leaving white dwarf Higher­mass stars­die in titanic explosions calledsupernovae;  cores collapse to form neutron stars  black holes Searching for habitable planets: long­lasting, hydrogen­fusing stage of stars’ lives Luminosity (the total amount of light a star emits into space) also depends on distance (apart from brightness) Spectroscopy: an invention to learn more about stars’ properties  Stellar spectrum the women astronomers of Harvard College Observatory made many great discoveries at the beginning, Pickering’s sequence of spectral types A to O: using type A to designate stars with the strongest hydrogen lines, type B for those with slightly  fainter lines, and so on down the alphabet to type O for stars showing the weakest lines. But Redundancies and the spectra fell into a much more natural order than he had supposed Then, the spectral sequence: 7 major spectral types, OBAFGKM (Oh, Be A Fine Girl, Kiss Me); subdivided by number Our Sun: G2 The system of stellar classification adopted in 1910 1925, Payne­Gaposchkin showed that the differences in the spectral types reflected differences in the surface temperatures of the stars. Hertzsprung–Russell dia­ grams : graphs of the relationship between luminosity and surface temperature All stars are born with basically the same composition, which is almost entirely (98% or more) hydrogen and helium During the hydrogen­fusing phase of its life, a star’s surface temperature (and hence its spectral type) and total luminosity are determined primarily by one thing:  the star’s mass There is an enormous range in luminosity, and a much smaller range in mass The rule is a general one:The more massive the star, the shorter its  lifetime  Which stars make good sun? O, B (No, short lifetimes for the formation of planets and for life to take hold) A,F (quite possible­ deep underground, subsurface oceans or ice. Or if they have a thick atmosphere or atmosphere containing sufficient oxygen) (fair lifetimes;  hotter than the sun, so habitable zones would be wider and would lie at greater distances from their central star; BUT higher temperatures mean much ultraviolet  light, which easily breaks chemical bonds in complex organic molecules) (complex plants and animals on Earth did not arise until our planet was some 4 billion  years old, the 1­ to 2­billion­year lifetime of A and F stars suggests that life on these planets would most likely be much simpler than life on Earth) K,M (long life but the habitable zone becomes progressively smaller and closer­in for stars of lower luminosity) (two objections­planets orbiting close to a star get locked into synchronous rotation, with one side of the planet perpetually facing the star; small stars have  frequent and energetic flares*—sudden bursts of intense light and radiation—that might cook any complex life.) neither of these objections is fatal (atmosphere circulates heat; protective layer of atmospheric ozone) Brown Dwarfs an object with a mass less than 8% that of the Sun, gravity isn’t strong enough to compress the core to high enough temperatures to sustain hydrogen fusion substellar objects are called brown dwarfs very dim and difficult to detect (easy with infrared telescopes as they emit moderate amounts of infrared radiation) BUT have much hotter surfaces than planets Have no habitable zones at all, but could have planets orbited by Europa­like moons with subsurface oceans and perhaps life. multiple star systems: in which two or more stars orbit each other closely binary star systems with just two stars (more common) 11.2 there are really only two basic ways to search for extrasolar planets: 1.Directly:  Pictures or spectra of the planets themselves constitute direct evidence of their existence.
More Less

Related notes for Astronomy 2021A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit