Textbook Notes (368,317)
Canada (161,798)
Psychology (4,889)
Chapter 10

Psych2043: Chapter 10 - Hearing Impairments.docx

6 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2043A/B
Professor
Esther Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
CHILDREN WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENTS (Chapter 10) Normal Hearing Development ­ Hearing is essential for speech and language development ­ Hearing losses must be identified as soon as possible = continually monitor  speech and language development… ­ If it goes unnoticed, delays in speech and language occur ­ Brain pathways for hearing (as with vision) develop when stimulated ­ Children under 2 who receive amplification early develop better ­ Less serious hearing losses are not identified until later (2+ years) ­ How the ear works: ­ Sound transmitted as waves, gathered by outer ear and sent down ear canal ­ Eardrum vibrates which moves three bones in middle ear ­ Bones moving causes fluid in inner ear (cochlea) to move ­ Fluid movement causes hair cells to bend = electrical impulse ­ Electrical impulses are transmitted to auditory nerve ­ Brain interprets signals as sound ­ Hearing milestones: ­ Birth­3 months – startle reflex, soothed by your voice, turns to you when you  speak ­ 3­6 months – turns to new sounds, imitates own voice, repeats sounds  *First 6 months is the same with both hearing and deaf – after this they  will babble less, it will be monotonous, and they will be mute by 1 year  old ­ 6­10 months – responds to name, knows common things, babbling sounds even  when alone, looks to things you talk about ­ 10­15 months – plays with voice, imitates words/sounds, knows one step  commands with gesture ­ 15­18 months – follows directions without being shown, uses 2 word sentences,  knows 10­20 words ­ 18­24 months – understands yes/no questions and simple phrases ­ 24­36 months – chooses things by size, understands action words, follows two  step commands ­ Early signs of hearing loss ­ Failure to startle at loud sounds ­ Not turning towards a voice or imitating sounds after 6 months old ­ No babbling at 9 months ­ No single words by 18 months ­ Using gestures instead of words for needs ­ Lagging in receptive language ­ No turning to a voice ­ Figure out simple commands at early age from gestures but later with  complex instructions (16 months) cannot respond Sound Terminology ­ Sound – vibration capable of being detected by the ear ­ Travels in waves – features of the wave produce elements of sounds ­ Pitch – determined by frequency of sound wave ­ High frequency = high pitch ­ Measured in units of hertz (Hz) ­ Low = bass (thunder), midrange = telephone, speech, high = treble (bells) ­ Intensity/Loudness – determined by amplitude of wave (energy/height of wave) ­ Large amplitude = loud sound ­ Measured in decibels (dB) ­ Human speech is less than 60 decibels *Amplified makes waves bigger by adding electrical energy = louder ­ Quality – determined by patterns in the waves ­ Pleasant sounds have regular wave patterns (repeated) ­ If no repeated pattern = noise/unpleasant  ­ Audiogram – a visual representation of someone’s hearing ­ A chart of the softest sounds a person can hear at various pitches ­ Pitch (x, low to high) vs. Intensity (y, soft to loud) ­ Left ear = marked with X ­ Right ear = marked with O ­ Hearing threshold – the softest sound heard 50% of the time at each pitch ­ Normal for adults – 0­25dB threshold ­ Lower than that threshold = hearing loss  Interpreting Speech ­ Speech occurs across a range of frequencies  ­ Vowels have low frequency and are more intensity (loud) ­ Consonants have high frequency ­ Changing intensity during speech changes emphasis ­ A person with hearing loss may only hear parts of words ­ Sloping loss – miss high frequency sounds (soft consonants) ­ Speech is 10­60 decibels and 200­6,000 Hz ­ Noise­induced hearing damage is related to duration and volume of exposure ­ 85db for 8 hours a day is the safe exposure limit ­ Short exposure to extremely loud noises can cause permanent damage Classifying Hearing Loss ­ By degree ­ Ranging from mild, moderate, severe, or profound ­ Loss of 25­40 dB = mild loss of dB = must be that much  ­ Loss of 40­60 dB = moderate louder to hear it ­ Loss of 60­80 dB = severe ­ Loss of 80+ dB = profound ­ Hearing impaired describes any degree of loss (deaf and hard of hearing) ­ Deaf – hearing loss so severe that there is little/no functional hearing ­ Hard of hearing – there may be enough residual hearing that an auditory  device can provide sufficient assistance to allow speech processing (mild,  moderate, or severe loss) ­ Residual hearing – the amount of hearing remaining after a hearing loss ­ Deafened – a person who becomes deaf as an adult ­ IDEA definition: ­ Hearing impairment – impairment in hearing, permanent or fluctuating,  which adversely affects educational performance ­ Deafness – a hearing impairment so severe that the child is impaired in  processing linguistic information (with or without amplification) ­ In Ontario, deaf or hard of hearing – impairment characterized by deficits in  language and speech development because of diminished/non­existent auditory  response to sound ­ By type (location of the damage associated with the loss) ­ Conductive hearing loss ­ Minor, involving obstruction of outer/middle ear ­ Affects loudness of sounds heard ­ Often temporary, treated medically ­ Short duration of loss – language learning not affected ­ Chronic problems – speech and language development and educational  performance impacted ­ Sensorineural hearing loss ­ Damage to the sensory hair cells or nerves of the inner ear ­ Inner ear cannot identify some pitches of sounds ­ Loss affects both loudness and clarity of sounds heard ­ Ranges from mild to profound loss, affecting different frequencies more  than others ­ Permanent, irreparable, hearing aids can provide some benefit ­ Mixed hearing loss ­ Problems with both middle and inner ear ­ Loss affects loudness and clarity (distortion) ­ Severity of each type of loss will affect the severity of the impact ­ By timing ­ Pre­lingual – before spoken language is developed ­ Impairment is congenital or acquired before speech ­ Most often it is the result of an acquired condition ­ Child is unable to access audible communication from the outset *UNLESS born into a deaf family – sign language used = no delay  in language ­ Severe, stable, and less common ­ Deaf = impairment recognized quickly ­ Deprived of auditory language input = leads to diminished  reading and writing skills ­ Congenital deafness – born deaf ­ Adventitious (acquired) deafness – become deaf from disease ­ Born hard of hearing = impairment often undetected
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2043A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit