Textbook Notes (368,107)
Canada (161,650)
Geography (106)
GG231 (31)
Rob Milne (27)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3 .docx

4 Pages
143 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GG231
Professor
Rob Milne
Semester
Winter

Description
1 Chapter 3 – Tsunami Catastrophe in the Indian Ocean • Close to 230,000 people killed on December 26, 2004 • Moment magnitude 9.1 quake just off the island of Sumatra along a fault o The fault ruptured a distance over 1200 km.  o Seafloor slipped as much as 5m vertically and 15m horizontally.  o No warning system in bordering countries. o Waves took over 7 hours to cross the entire Indian Ocean • Tsunamis are much more common in the Pacific Ocean than the Indian Ocean 3.1 Introduction to Tsunami • Several types of events can trigger a Tsunami, including large earthquakes, landslides, or  explosive volcanic eruptions.  Earthquake-Triggered Tsunami • Quakes can cause tsunami by displacing the seafloor or by triggering a large landslide.  • Displacing the seafloor occurs when a block of the Earth’s crust moves rapidly up or  down during an earthquake.  • In general, it takes a quake with a magnitude of 7.5 or over to generate damaging tsunami • 4 Stages: o Displacement of seafloor sets in motion oscillatory waves that transmit energy  outward and upward from the source (much like ripples in a pond). o In the deep ocean, waves are rapid (up to 500km/h) and spaced far part. In the  deep ocean, the spacing between crests of waves can be more than 100 km, and  the height of waves is generally less than 1 m, meaning you would never know a  tsunami is coming in the deep ocean o As the waves approach land, velocity decreases, and the forward speed may be  about 45 km/h. Decrease in spacing also occurs o As the first wave approaches water, it forms into a turbulent, surging mass of  water that move inland. Several metres to several tens of metres high.  • Common misconception: Tsunami is only one wave.  • The run­up of the tsunami is the maximum horizontal and vertical distances that the  largest wave reaches.  • Edge waves that travel alonndthe rdore interact with tsunami wasts to create a complex  amplification, causing the 2  or 3  waves to be larger than the 1 .  • Distant­tsunami or tele­tsunami travels thousands of kms and strikes remote shorelines. A  local tsunami affects shoreline from the source of the earthquake over 100 km away.  Landslide-Triggered Tsunami • Landslides on the seafloor or landslides falling from a mountain into a body of water.  In  many cases, earthquakes trigger these.  • Landslide tsunami loses energy over distances of thousands of kilometres, and wave run­ ups on the west coast of North America would not be catastrophic.  2 Volcano-Triggered Tsunami • Much less common • However, second most deadly tsunami in history was caused by huge eruption of  Krakatoa, an active volcano in the Sundra Strait (Indonesia). o Produced nearly 21km of fragmented rock and ash and destroyed 2/3 of the island  of Krakatoa.  3.2 Regions at Risk • Some coasts are much more at risk than others • Coasts in proximity to a major subduction zone, or directly across the ocean basin from a  subduction zone capable of generating M9 earthquakes are at major risk.  • 85% of tsunami have been in Pacific Ocean o Areas of greatest risk: Japan, Hawaii, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and northeast Pacific  Coast from Alaska to northern California. o Other areas of risk include eastern Indian Ocean and parts of Mediterranean rd th • Alaska earthquake on March 27, 1964 was the 3  largest in 20  century and responsible  for tsunami that killed 130 people as far away as California.  3.3 Effects of Tsunami and Linkages with Other Natural Hazards • Tsunami have both Primary and Secondary effects o Primary – related to the impact of the onrushing water and its entrained debris,  and to the resulting flooding and erosion. o Most of the damage to both the landscape and human structures r
More Less

Related notes for GG231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit