Textbook Notes (369,035)
Canada (162,359)
Philosophy (101)
PP111 (14)
Chapter 4

PP111 Chapter 4 Notes.docx
Premium

3 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PP111
Professor
Gary Foster
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 4: Divided Selves Common Strategy • Both John Locke and Thomas Reid agreed that something must be preserved  unchanged throughout the many stages of a person’s life if she is to qualify as the  same person at those different times • Locke’s view is that memory is what stays constant • Reid view is the invisible entity of Self • Diotima, “We assume that a man is the same person in his old age as in his  infancy… everyday he is becoming a new man, while the old man is ceasing to  exist” David Hume on the Self • Self: o Something that persists continuously, uninterrupted, ‘the whole course of  our lives’: o Something that is ‘simple’­ i.e. it is not divisible into parts; o Something that we are, or can be, conscious of whenever we direct our  attention to it (‘we feel its existence’) • Hume’s Attempts: 1. An argument against the idea that we have a Self 2. A diagnosis of the errors that misleads us into thinking we have a Self 3. Metaphysical accounts of what persons actually are, to replace the idea  that we are a Self.  ‘Of Personal Identity’ (David Hume, 1739) • He argues the personal identity as we commonly use the term as it relates to  “ordinary people”, does not exist.  At least not in the way that we think it does • The identity of a person as nothing more than the totality of that persons  perceptions, this bundle makes up the “identity” of that person o Only in flux “no moment during conscious life where our perceptions  remain constant through time • Identity of objects: o Being definable because they stay the same through time, so that if a  person were to examine them today, tomorrow or next week, they would  still be the same object o The ways in which objects remain the same constitutes their identity • Perceptual Bundle: o Those constituents are always in flux o Personal Identity does not exist, in the same way, as other ordinary objects  and in a sense could be said not to exist at all • Quote: o “Thus the principle of individuation is nothing but the invariableness and  uninterruptedness of any object, thro’ a supposed variation of time, by  which the mind can trace it in the different periods of its existence,  without any break of the vi
More Less

Related notes for PP111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit