Textbook Notes (359,190)
Canada (156,076)
York University (12,168)
Psychology (3,512)
PSYC 1010 (1,063)
Chapter 9

Chapter 9-Psychology final.docx
Chapter 9-Psychology final.docx

6 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

School
York University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Gerry Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 9: Psychology Intelligence and Psychological Testing  Key Concepts in Psychological Testing ­ Psychological test: is a standardized measure of a sample of a person’s behaviour.   ­ Psychological tests are measurement instruments; they are used to measure the  individual differences that exist among people in abilities, aptitudes, interests, and  aspects of personality. Mental Ability Tests:  ­ Intelligence tests: measure general mental ability; intended to assess intellectual  potential rather than previous learning or accumulated knowledge.   ­ Aptitude tests: assess specific types of mental abilities.  (Differential aptitude  tests: assess verbal reasoning, numerical ability, abstract reasoning.  Achievement  tests: measure previous learning instead of potential.)  ­ Achievement tests: gauge a person’s mastery and knowledge of various subjects.   ­ Personality tests: measure various aspects of personality, including motives,  interests, values, and attitudes.   Standardization and Norms: ­ Standardization: refers to the uniform procedures used in the administration and  scoring of a test.  ­ Test Norms: provide information about where a score on a psychological test  ranks in relation to other scores on that test.   ­ A percentile score: indicates the percentage of people who score at or below the  score one has obtained.  (Ex. 82  percentile means that you appear to be as  assertive or more assertive than 82% of the sample of people who provided the  basis for the test norms.) Reliability:  ­ Refers to the measurement consistency of a test (or of other kinds of measurement  techniques.)   ­ Approach to check test re­test reliability: estimated by comparing subject’s scores  on two administrations of a test.   ­ A correlation coefficient: is a numerical index of the degree of relationship  between two variables.   ­ The closer to +1.00, the more reliable the test.   Validity:  ­ Refers to the ability of a test to measure what it was designed to measure.   ­ Content validity: refers to the degree to which the content of a test is  representative of the domain it’s supposed to cover. (Crucial on classroom tests) ­ Criterion­related validity: is estimated by correlating subjects’ scores on a test  with their scores on an independent criterion (another measure) of the trait  assessed by the test.  (Used to predict performance in university, job capability,  and suitability.) ­ Construct validity: the extent to which there is evidence that a test measures a  particular hypothetical construct.   The Evolution of Intelligence Testing  Binet’s Breakthrough: ­ Mental age: indicated that he or she displayed the mental ability typical of a child  of that chronological (actual) age.   Terman and the Stanford­Binet: ­ Intelligence Quotient: is a child’s mental age divided by chronological age,  multiplied by 100.   The debate about the structure of intelligence ­ Factor analysis: correlations among many variables are analyzed to identify  closely related clusters of variables.   ­ G stands for general mental ability, which is an important core factor that all  cognitive abilities share.   ­ Thurstone carved intelligence into seven independent factors called primary  mental abilities: word fluency, verbal comprehension, spatial ability, perceptual  speed, numerical ability, inductive reasoning, and memory.   ­ Fluid intelligence: involves reasoning ability, memory capacity, and speed of  information processing. ­ Crystallized intelligence: involves the ability to apply acquired knowledge and  skills in problem solving.   ­ Contemporary IQ tests subdivide g into 10­15 specific abilities.   Basic Question about Intelligence Testing  What do modern IQ scores mean?  ­ Normal distribution: is a symmetric, bell­shaped curve that represents the pattern  in which man characteristics are dispersed in the population.   ­ Deviation IQ scores: that locate subjects precisely within the normal distribution,  using the standard deviation as the unit of measurement.   ­ Standard deviation shows where you fall in the normal distribution of intelligence,  100 being the average.   Do intelligence tests have adequate reliability? ­ Yes.   ­ They also have good validity and measure what they are supposed too ­ The main idea is to predict school performance ­ IQ scores as predictors of performance within a particular occupation: 1) There is a substantial correlation between IQ scores and job performance 2) Correlation varies depending on the complexity of a job’s requirements  3) This association holds up even when workers have more experience at their jobs 4) Measures of specific mental abilities and personality traits are much less  predictive of job performance than measures of intelligence.   Extremes of Intelligence Intellectual disability:  ­ Refers to subnormal general mental ability accompanied by deficiencies in  adaptive skills, originating before age 18.   ­ Three broad domains of adaptive skills: 1) Conceptual skills: managing money, and writing a letter 2) Social skills: making friends, and coping with others’ demands 3) Practical skills: preparing meals, using transportation, shopping Levels of Intellectual Disability: ­ Firs level mild: IQ range 51­70, education possible grade 6, and be self­ supporting. ­ Second level is moderate: IQ 36­50, grade possible 2­4, can be semi­independent. ­ Third level Severe: IQ 20­35: limited speech, toilet habits, and needs total  supervision and can help to contribute to support ­ Fourth level Profound: IQ below 20, little or no speech; not toilet trained, and  needs total care.   Origins of Disabilities:  ­ Down syndrome­ slanted eyes, stubby limbs, and thin hair, may carry an extra  chromosome. ­ Fragile x syndrome: common cause of hereditary intellectual disability, there is a  mutation in the inherited gene.   ­ Phenylketonuria: is a metabolic disorder to an inherited enzyme deficiency, which  can lead to intellectual disability.   ­ Hydrocephaly: Excessive accumulation of cerebrospina
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit