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Chapter 3

PSYC 3410 Chapter Notes - Chapter 3: Dishabituation, Homeostasis, Classical Conditioning


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 3410
Professor
Elissa Rodkey
Chapter
3

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Elicited Behaviours and
Classical Conditioning- Chapter
3
Elicited Behaviours
-an elicited behaviour is one that can be automatically drawn out by a certain stimulus
Reflexes
-Reflex- a relatively simple, automatic response to a stimulus
-Startle Response- a defensive reaction to a sudden, unexpected stimulus; involves the
tightening of skeletal muscles as well as hormonal and visceral changes
-Orienting Response- automatically positioning ourselves to facilitate attending a stimulus;
involves major body movement such that we automatically turn in response to an unfamiliar
noise
-many reflexes are tied to survival
-reflex arc- a neural structure that underlies ,amy reflexes and consists of a sensory neuron,
interneuron, and a motor neuron
-we begin withdrawing our hand from a flame before feeling any pain
-the flexion response uses the spinal corde so we can react much quicker than if the message
had to travel up to the brain and then back down to our limbs
Fixed Action Patterns
-fixed action patterns (instincts)- a fixed sequence of responses elicited by a specific
stimulus (sign stimulus/ releaser)
-adaptive responses that have evolved to help species cope with consistent aspects of their
environment
Simple Mechanisms of Learning
Habituation and Sensitization
-Habituation- decrease in the strength of an elicited behaviour following repeated
presentations of the eliciting stimulus (low-intensity stimulation)
-Sensitization- an increase in the strength of an elicited nehaviour following repeated
presentations of the eliciting stimulus (high-intensity stimulation)
-the strength of an elicited behaviour returns to its original level when the stimulus is not
repeated for a period of time
-it takes longer for a behaviour to return to its original level (long-term habituation), when the
stimulus is presented less often to begin with
-sensitization often generalizes to other stimuli
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