Ch10.docx

9 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL 201
Professor
Sylvia Thompson
Semester
Fall

Description
Ch. 10 Voting, Campaigns, and Elections 10/31/2012 Elections and Democracy  The Prospective (or Responsible Party) Voting Model The idea of responsible party elections is based on the old commonsense notion that elections  should present a  “real choice”­ voters are interested in and capable of deciding what government  will do in the future Theory Each of the two parties must be cohesive and unified for this to work Each must takes clear policy positions that differ Winning party must do exactly what it said it would Potential Problems Might increase the frequency and intensity of political conflicts No reason to compromise Likely to lead to a gridlock The Electoral Competition Voting Model Unified parties compete for votes by taking the most popular positions they can Theory It should not matter which party wins because the winner enacts the policies that most voters  want (if they keep their promises) Democracy is ensured through competition Potential Problems Can break down if the parties are fragmented or ambiguous, if they care about policies for  ideological reasons rather than for securing the most votes, or if they seek contributors’ dollars  rather than citizens’ votes Voters must consider nothing but the issues Parties have to keep to their promises The Retrospective (or Reward and Punishment) Voting Model Voters judge how well a group in power had governed and decide if they want this group to  continue in office Theory Reward success with reelection and punish failure by throwing the incumbents out Strong incentives to bring about peace and prosperity and solve problems that the American  people want solved Simple Potential Problems It gets rid of bad political leaders only after (not before) disasters happen, without guaranteeing  the next leaders will be any better Focuses only on the most prominent issues Imperfect Electoral Democracy Each of the three processes exist, to some extent, in American elections They sometimes conflict A number of ballots in each election are disqualified The Unique Nature of American Elections Elections Are Numerous and Frequent Elections Are Separate and Independent from One Another Inconsistent Election Procedures and Vote­Counting Federal government plays no role in regulating and overseeing elections Elected Positions Have Fixed Terms of Office Elections Are Held on a Fixed Date The Tuesday after the first Monday in November  “First Past the Post” Wins Those who win the most votes, not necessarily the majority Voting in the United States Expansion of the Franchise In early years many of the states limited the right to vote White Male Suffrage Property and religion barriers fall first Blacks, Women, and Young People 15  Amendment and Voting Rights Act of 1965 allow blacks to vote th 19  Amendment allows women to vote DC citizens gained the right to vote for President 18 to 20 year olds gained the right in 1971 Direct Partisan Elections Winner­take­all popular vote for a slate of electors Nominate presidential candidates in national party conventions ­> state primaries or state party  caucuses th 17  Amendment­ direct elections of senators Low Voting Turnout During the first 100 years more people gained the right to vote and more people turned out on  election day By 1840, the figure had reached 80% Turnouts are lower now­ about 50%­65% in presidential elections, 40%­50% in off years; 10%­ 20% in primaries and minor local elections Barriers to Voting Only citizens who take the initiative to register to vote beforehand are permitted to vote In other countries, citizens are required to vote and are fined if they don’t Western European countries make election day a national holiday Too Much Complexity Choices for multiple federal, state, and local offices + referenda and initiatives Referenda­ procedures available in some states by which state laws or constitutional amendments  proposed by the legislature are submitted to the voters for approval or rejection Initiatives­ procedures available in some states for citizens to put proposed laws and  constitutional amendments on the ballot for voter approval or rejection Weak Voter Mobilization by the Parties A Decline in Competitive Elections House and se
More Less

Related notes for POL 201

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit