Textbook Notes (368,425)
United States (206,032)
Chemistry (38)
CHM 2046 (15)
Christou (14)
Chapter 22

Chapter 22 Transition Metals week 2 2009.doc

5 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHM 2046
Professor
Christou
Semester
Spring

Description
 Section 22.5. Bonding in Coordination Complexes:   Ligand Field Theory.  The most modern theory, an amalgamation of the older ‘crystal field theory’ and molecular  orbital theory. It explains well the observed properties of coordination complexes. x+ The theory assumes that the attraction between M  and L is largely (but not completely)  ionic/electrostatic i.e. that the M­L bond is primarily due to an electrostatic (charge) attraction  n+ ­ δ­ between the positive charge of M  and negative (or partial negative) charge of L or L , e.g.  Cl, Br, CN, NH , H O, etc. 3 2 The great thing about Ligand Field Theory is that it considers the change in energy of the metal  d­orbitals caused by the approach of the L to the M. This explains the observed colors  and many other props. x+ As the ligands L approach the M  positions that they will occupy for that coordination  geometry, they destabilize (raise the energy of) those d­orbitals occupying that region of space  more than they destabilize those orbitals that do not, i.e. all d­orbitals are destabilized, but  some more than others. Thus, the d­orbitals do not all have the same energy anymore (they do in  x+ the free M  ion). The shapes of the  five d orbitals  are shown in blue  in figures B­F. Only the d  anz2 dx2­y2 point  towards the L  (orange balls). dx2­y2and d z2rbitals  lie on the axes and  are more affected by  the approaching  ligands L, because they point straight at them. Therefore: 1 Δ = “crystal field splitting energy”. For octahedral geometry, we often write Δ  (o for  O octahedral).  x+ n The available d electrons for that M  (i.e. d ) occupy these d­orbitals, lowest energy ones first.  This explains the colors of transition metal compounds – movement of e  from lower to upper  energy orbitals absorbs visible light – gives colored solutions! Example:    3+ 3+ 1 + green- [Ti(H 2) ]6 contains Ti  (d )    __  __ __  __ absorbs green­yellow light,     yellow photon therefore appears purple __  __  __               __  __  __ ground state       excited state (ΔE  = E  = Δ = hc/λ) electron photon O  λ = wavelength of light: λ decreases with increasing energy h = Planck’s constant     c = speed of light in a vacuum Different ligands L cause different splittings Δ “strong­field ligands”  ­  give big Δ “weak­field ligands”    ­   give small Δ A ranking of different L according to what Δ they give is known as “the spectrochemical  series”.  2 Understanding Ligand Field Theory and the spectrochemical series also allows us to  understand the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds, our final topic. The Magnetic Properties of Transition Metal Complexes Magnetism is due to the presence of unpaired electrons i.e. only one electron in an orbital. The  number of unpaired electrons that a particular M  ion will have depends on: 1. The identity of the metal (3d vs 4d/5d) 2. The oxidation state of the metal  3. The d  (the total number 
More Less

Related notes for CHM 2046

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit