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Lecture 18

CANS 406 Lecture Notes - Social Reproduction, Marilyn Waring
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3 Pages
15 Views
Winter 2018

Department
Canadian Studies
Course Code
CANS 406
Professor
Desmond Morton
Lecture
18

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Violence and IPE
-Political economy approach reveals coercion not only in direct physical violence, but in
“material basis of relationships” that shape how resources, authority, privileges and benefits are
disturbed (True)
-Central claim: gendered inequalities that fuel violence against women are rooted in the
structures and processes of the political economy
-This approach reveals the workings of power in the material bases of relationships that govern
distribution of resources, benefits, privileges, etc.
-Violence against women is motivated by material concerns, desire to maintain systems and
practices that serve patriarchal interests
-True: calculating costs of VAW is difficult to measure
-Direct/indirect opportunity costs
-Costs inflicted on women themselves
-Costs imposed on children, future generations, communities, governments (costs of
social welfare, unemployment, health care system, criminal justice systems)
Political Economies of War: Gendered Experiences
-We need to think of war not just as a singular event, but in a much broader frame
-Structural and social relations that led into war, how they changed in war, and how they
continue to evolve, etc. (Raven-Roberts)
-Reframing ideas in terms of temporality
-Raven-Roberts: to understand gendered socio-economic impacts of war, we need to see war in a
wide temporal frame
-War disrupts ‘normal’ divisions of labor and social production patterns, leading women to take
on jobs (formal or informal) that they may not have previously done
-Illicit economies that can put them at risk, but can also serve as an opportunity for them,
not necessarily disempowering
-Women may be pushed to take on new productive roles, motivated by:
-Loss of traditional livelihood
-Safety concerns facing men
-New incentives created by international actors
-Loss of male household members (death, war, migration)
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Description
Violence and IPE -Political economy approach reveals coercion not only in direct physical violence, but in material basis of relationships that shape how resources, authority, privileges and benefits are disturbed (True) -Central claim: gendered inequalities that fuel violence against women are rooted in the structures and processes of the political economy -This approach reveals the workings of power in the material bases of relationships that govern distribution of resources, benefits, privileges, etc. -Violence against women is motivated by material concerns, desire to maintain systems and practices that serve patriarchal interests -True: calculating costs of VAW is difficult to measure -Direct/indirect opportunity costs -Costs inflicted on women themselves -Costs imposed on children, future generations, communities, governments (costs of social welfare, unemployment, health care system, criminal justice systems) Political Economies of War: Gendered Experiences -We need to think of war not just as a singular event, but in a much broader frame -Structural and social relations that led into war, how they changed in war, and how they continue to evolve, etc. (Raven-Roberts) -Reframing ideas in terms of temporality -Raven-Roberts: to understand gendered socio-economic impacts of war, we need to see war in a wide temporal frame -War disrupts normal divisions of labor and social production patterns, leading women to take on jobs (formal or informal) that they may not have previously done -Illicit economies that can put them at risk, but can also serve as an opportunity for them, not necessarily disempowering -Women may be pushed to take on new productive roles, motivated by: -Loss of traditional livelihood -Safety concerns facing men -New incentives created by international actors -Loss of male household members (death, war, migration)
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