Class Notes (838,973)
Canada (511,150)
Lecture

13 March 17 - Huntington's Disease, prions.docx
Premium

4 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Life Sciences
Course
LIFESCI 3B03
Professor
Margaret Fahnestock
Semester
Winter

Description
LECTURE 13 LIFSCI 3B03 Huntington’s Disease and Prions March 17, 2014 − First neurological disease genetically linked to a gene o Discovered decades ago, but still no treatment or cure − Movement disorder (involuntary movements); speech disturbances and cognitive decline o Neurons in the straitum die, but not the same pathway as in Parkinsns Disease (nigral striatal pathway) − Loss of neurons in the caudate and putamen (striatum), a brain area critical to movement and coordination  o Striatum divided into caudate and putamen − Parkinsons – nigral striatal – cell bodies in sub nig and send processes to striatum; use DA  − Huntingtons – neurons go in opposite direction from Parkinsons; go from caudate and putamen, through globus pallidus, to thalamus, to motor  cortex o Stratium neurons die, motor cortex does not get activated  ▯motor disturbances Genetic Mechanism − Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion o Huntington’s Disease (neurodegeneration) – first discovered trinucleotide expansion o Fragile X Syndrome (mental retardation) o Myotonic dystrophy (muscle weakness and atrophy) o Kennedy Syndrome (motor neuron degeneration) − Mechanism – slippage during cell division causes a trinucleotide to repeat many times o When the cell divides, the replication machinery slips across trinucleotide repeat section and causes expansion Huntington’s Disease  − Trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene: 11­34 copies is normal, 37­86 copies causes the disease o Run of glutamines  − Number of repeats correlated with age of onset and severity of symptoms  − Anticipation – gets worse with successive generations  o Mechanism – slippage during cell division; with successive generations, get more slippage causing more repeats to appear Figure  − CAG Triplet (codes for glutamine) o Fewer repeats in normal huntingtin gene o Slippage causes extra − Protein has many glutamine residues  − Huntingtin binds HAP1 (huntingtin associated protein 1, axonal transport) by glutamines – excessive glutamine changes interaction so that it doesn’t  operate correctly  Huntington Axonal Transport − Huntingtin protein is involved in axonal transport – Huntington phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch for anterograde/retrograde transport − Phosphorylation – anterograde (+) − Dephosphorylation – retrograde transport (­)  − Along the microtubule, transport the cargo (grey; can be signaling endosomes, mitochondria, organelles etc) by dynactin complex o Dynactin consists of a number of proteins; connec which connects it to microtubules  − 2 proteins involved in axonal transport 1 LECTURE 13 LIFSCI 3B03 o Anterograde Transport – kinesin coupled to dynactin coupled when anterograde transport  o Retrograde Transport – dynein; molecular motor for transport in retrograde direction – when coupled to dynactin, then the other motor  (kinesin) is not coupled to complex − Huntingtin i(P­htt) – attached to LAP1 on dynactin complex and governs whether dynein or kinesin are transporting the cargo (determine  anterograde or retrograde) o When huntingtin is phosphorylated, changes conformation and binding to HAP1 – HAP1 attached to kinesin causing anterograde transport o When huntingtiin is dephosphorylated, changed conformation and HAP1 does not bind kinesin – dynein takes over causing retrograde  transport  − Switch by huntingtin does not operate properly in Huntington’s Disease – affects axonal transport  Issues − How does trinucleotide expansion lead to neuronal death?  o No absence of gene product, so its hard to explain o Protein aggregation – row of CAG causing expansion of glutamine makes protein prone to aggregation − How to account for neuronal selectivity? o True of most neurodegenerative diseases o Why just striatal neurons are compromised? Expansion occurs in other cells too! o Defect in transport is especially implicated – striatal pathway is long − Ethics of diagnosis without available treatment? o Easy to diagnose o Most individuals with Huntington’s Disease do not take the test Fragile X Syndrome − Learning disabilities and cognitive impairment − CGG triplet repeat is expanded within the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP1) gene, which is on the X chromosome o Repeat in regulatory region o Huntingtin is in coding region of gene − Normally, the triplet is repeated from 5­40 times − In Fragile X syndrome, CGG is repeated >200 times − So many expansions that chromosome doesn’t pack properly − Can see on the chromosome due to thin thread holding the expansion to the chromosome − Abnormally expanded CGG triplet repeat silences the FMRP1 gene by causing methylation of a regulatory region of the gene which blocks  production of FMRP o Silences FMRP by causing excessive methylation  o CG is prone to DNA methylation o FMRP does not get transcribed − FMRP is an RNA binding protein that associated with translating polyribosomes and modulates translation o Shut down FMRP action – 
More Less

Related notes for LIFESCI 3B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit